× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


In the Scottish/English Borderlands of the medieval era, Sim was first used as a surname. It was derived from Simon, and meant son of Simon.

Sim Early Origins



The surname Sim was first found in East Lothian, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

Close

Sim Spelling Variations


Expand

Sim Spelling Variations



Scribes in the Middle Ages simply spelled according to sound. The result is an enormous number of spelling variations among names that evolved in that era. Sim has been spelled Simms, Symes, Sime, Simes, Sim, Sym, Syms, Syme and others.

Close

Sim Early History


Expand

Sim Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sim research. Another 188 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1162, 1503, 1530, and 1596 are included under the topic Early Sim History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Sim Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

Sim Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Sim Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Sim In Ireland


Expand

Sim In Ireland



Some of the Sim family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 233 words (17 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



Most of the Boernician-Scottish families who came to North America settled on the eastern seaboard of what would become the United States and Canada. Families who wanted a new order stayed south in the War of Independence, while those who were still loyal to the crown went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. In the 20th century, the ancestors of these families have gone on to rediscover their heritage through Clan societies and other patriotic Scottish organizations. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Sim or a variant listed above:

Sim Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Alexander Sim, who landed in Maryland in 1674

Sim Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Geo Christ Sim, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1749
  • Jane Sim, aged 24, arrived in North Carolina in 1774
  • John Sim, aged 16, landed in New York in 1774

Sim Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • George Sim, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1845

Sim Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Robert Sim, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1773

Sim Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Thomas Sim, who landed in Canada in 1830
  • William Sim, who arrived in Canada in 1830
  • Peter, Sim Jr., who landed in Canada in 1830

Sim Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • James Sim, aged 30, a labourer, arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Reliance"
  • Ellen Sim, aged 26, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Oregon"
  • Jane Sim, aged 31, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Oregon"
  • Charles Sim, aged 39, a farm servant, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "John Bunyan"
  • Elizabeth Sim, aged 30, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "John Bunyan"
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sim Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Margaret Sim, aged 26, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Constance" in 1862
  • Jane Sim, aged 24, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Constance" in 1862
  • John Sim arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Blue Jacket" in 1865
  • Hughina Sim arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Blue Jacket" in 1865

Close

Contemporary Notables of the name Sim (post 1700)


Expand

Contemporary Notables of the name Sim (post 1700)



  • Alastair Sim CBE (1900-1976), Scottish actor, best remembered in the role of Ebenezer Scrooge in the 1951 film Scrooge
  • karl Feoder "CF Goldie" Sim (b. 1923), New Zealand art forger
  • Sheila Sim (b. 1922), Baroness Attenborough, English film and theatre actress, wife of actor and director Richard Attenborough
  • Thomas Robertson Sim (1858-1938), South African botanist
  • Jon Sim (b. 1977), Canadian NHL ice hockey player
  • Dave Sim (b. 1956), Canadian comic book author

Close

Sim Historic Events


Expand

Sim Historic Events




HMS Hood

  • Mr. Alexander E Sim (b. 1915), Scottish Sick Berth Attendant serving for the Royal Navy from Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who sailed into battle on the HMS Hood and died on 24th May 1941 in the sinking

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna et labore
Motto Translation: By fortune and labor.


Close

Sim Family Crest Products


Expand

Sim Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



    Other References

    1. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
    2. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Socts Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Modern Application of the Art of Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    3. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
    4. Donaldson, Gordon and Robert S. Morpeth. Who's Who In Scotish History. Wales: Welsh Academic Press, 1996. Print. (ISBN 186057-0054).
    5. Bloxham, Ben. Key to Parochial Registers of Scotland From Earliest Times Through 1854 2nd edition. Provo, UT: Stevenson's Genealogical Center, 1979. Print.
    6. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    7. Martine, Roddy, Roderick Martine and Don Pottinger. Scottish Clan and Family Names Their Arms, Origins and Tartans. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 1992. Print.
    8. Scots Kith and Kin And Illustrated Map Revised 2nd Edition. Edinburgh: Clan House/Albyn. Print.
    9. Warner, Philip Warner. Famous Scottish Battles. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1996. Print. (ISBN 0-76070-004-4).
    10. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
    11. ...

    The Sim Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Sim Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 21 November 2016 at 13:29.

    Sign Up

      


    FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
    House of Names on Facebook
    Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
    Houseofnames on Pinterest