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Shanley History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: Irish-Alt, Irish


The family name Shanley has an intrinsic connection to the Gaelic culture of Ireland. This east Connacht sept gathered their original Gaelic form of the name Shanley is Mac Seanlaoich, which is derived from the words "sean," meaning "old," and "laoch," meaning "hero."

Early Origins of the Shanley family


The surname Shanley was first found in Leitrim (Irish: Liatroim) anciently the western half of the kingdom of Breifne, located in Northeastern Ireland, in Leinster province, where they held a family seat in that county, some say, well before the 10th century.

Early History of the Shanley family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Shanley research.
Another 198 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1404, 1473, 1714 and 1714 are included under the topic Early Shanley History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Shanley Spelling Variations


Numerous spelling variations were revealed in the search for the origin of the name Shanley family name. Before widespread literacy, a person entrusted the proper documentation of his name to the individual scribe. As a result, a name was often recorded under several different variations during the life of its bearer. Variations found include Shanley, Shanly, MacShanley, McShanley, MacShanly and many more.

Early Notables of the Shanley family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Shanley Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Shanley family to the New World and Oceana


Ireland, as an English-controlled colony in the 19th century, suffered the loss of hundreds of thousands of its native people. The system of land ownership often did not sufficiently provide for the tenants who farmed the land. This was most clearly evidenced in the Great Potato Famine of the 1840s. Previous years of great demand for grain products and livestock had run the land down. Many landowners foreseeing an upcoming crisis often removed families from the land or forced them to rely on pitifully small plots where only a subsistence living could be made. When the famines of 1845, 46, and 48 hit, many had nothing. Disease and starvation became widespread and families boarded ships for elsewhere any way they could. Those who went to America were instrumental in developing the industrial power known today: many Irish were employed in hard labor positions in factories and in building the bridges, canals, roads, and railways necessary for a strong industrial nation. Research of early immigration and passenger lists has shown that many bearers of the name Shanley:

Shanley Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Thomas Shanley, who settled in Charles Town, South Carolina in 1767

Shanley Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • James D. Shanley, who settled in Philadelphia in 1819
  • Daniel Shanley, who was naturalized in South Carolina in 1832
  • Catherine Shanley, who settled in Vermont in 1854
  • Francis Shanley, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1867 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • A. J. Shanley, aged 40, who landed in America, in 1893
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Shanley Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Anna E. Shanley, aged 16, who settled in America from Longford, in 1904
  • Annie Shanley, who emigrated to the United States from Doomord, Ireland, in 1914
  • Alfred Shanley, aged 17, who landed in America from Sligo, Ireland, in 1920
  • Agnes Shanley, aged 41, who emigrated to the United States, in 1923

Shanley Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • James Shanley, whose death at sea was registered at Grosse Isle, Quebec in 1847
  • Mr. Joseph Shanley, aged 9 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Virginius" departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle in September 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 55)
  • Ms. Mary Shanley, aged 40 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Covenanter" departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in August 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 55)
  • Mr. James Shanley who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Virginius" departing 28th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 12th August 1847 but he died on board [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 95)
  • Mr. Michael Shanley, aged 17 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Marchioness of Breadalbane" departing 11th June 1847 from Sligo, Ireland; the ship arrived on 12th August 1847 but he died on board [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 95)

Shanley Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • James Shanley, English convict from London, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on August 08, 1849, settling in Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia in 1849 with 303 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1849
  • Ellen Shanley, aged 23, a farm servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Grand Trianon"
  • Eleanor Shanley, aged 18, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Aliquis"

Shanley Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Bridget Ann Shanley, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Andrew Jackson" in 1865

Contemporary Notables of the name Shanley (post 1700)


  • Mai Shanley (b. 1963), American beauty queen and pageant holder, Miss New Mexico USA 1984
  • John Shanley (1852-1909), American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church, Bishop of Fargo, North Dakota (1889 until his death)
  • Gib Shanley (1931-2008), American Emmy Award-winning sports anchor/reporter
  • Bernard Michael Shanley (1903-1992), White House Counsel (1953-1955) and White House Appointments Secretary (1955-1957)
  • John Patrick Shanley (b. 1950), American playwright and screenwriter awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Drama (along with a Tony award for best play) and won an Academy Award in 1987
  • Thomas J. Shanley, Irish restaurateur who with his 6 brothers founded the very popular Shanley's Restaurants, in Manhattan, New York in 1890; the last restaurant closed in 1925
  • Eleanor Shanley, Irish folk singer from Keshcarrigan in County Leitrim

The Shanley Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro patria et religione
Motto Translation: For country and religion


Shanley Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 55)
  3. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 95)
  4. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia in 1849 with 303 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1849

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