Seddon History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

In ancient Anglo-Saxon England, the ancestors of the Seddon surname lived in Seddon found in south-west Lancashire.

Early Origins of the Seddon family

The surname Seddon was first found in Durham where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Seddon family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Seddon research. Another 84 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1644 and 1700 are included under the topic Early Seddon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Seddon Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Seddon are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Seddon include: Seddon, Seddan, Sedden and others.

Early Notables of the Seddon family (pre 1700)

Another 50 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Seddon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Seddon Ranking

In the United States, the name Seddon is the 14,485th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [1]


United States Seddon migration to the United States +

Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Seddon or a variant listed above:

Seddon Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • George Seddon, who settled in Virginia in 1699
Seddon Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Joanna Seddon, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [2]
Seddon Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Seddon, who settled in New York in 1820 with his wife and two children
  • George, James, John, Joseph, Thomas, and William Seddon all, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1870
  • Aaron Seddon, who landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1868 [2]

Australia Seddon migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Seddon Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Giles Seddon, British Convict who was convicted in Guînes, Pas-de-Calais, France for life, transported aboard the "Canada" on 23rd April 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [3]
  • Eliza Seddon, English convict from Chester, who was transported aboard the "America" on December 30, 1830, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [4]
  • Mr. James Seddon who was convicted in Wigan, Greater Manchester, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Camden" on 21st March 1831, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [5]
  • John Seddon, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Duke Of Bronte" in 1849 [6]
  • Mr. Thomas Seddon, British convict who was convicted in Lancaster, Lancashire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Cornwall" on 28th February 1851, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Seddon migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Seddon Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Latham Seddon, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Mermaid" in 1859 [8]
  • Mr. Samuel F. Seddon, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Excelsior" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 17th March 1859 [9]
  • Mrs. Mary Seddon, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Excelsior" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 17th March 1859 [9]
  • Mr. Samuel Seddon, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Excelsior" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 17th March 1859 [9]
  • Miss Mary Seddon, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Excelsior" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 17th March 1859 [9]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Seddon migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [10]
Seddon Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Nicholas Seddon, who settled in St. Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635

Contemporary Notables of the name Seddon (post 1700) +

  • Margaret Rhea Seddon (b. 1947), former NASA astronaut with 3 shuttle missions and over 722 hours in space [11]
  • James Alexander Seddon (1815-1880), American lawyer and politician
  • Thomas Seddon (1821-1856), English landscape-painter, born in Aldersgate Street, London, son of Thomas Seddon, a well-known cabinet-maker
  • Thomas Seddon (1753-1796), English author, son of John Seddon, farmer, of Pendleton, near Manchester
  • John Seddon (1725-1770), English rector of Warrington Academy, second son of Peter Seddon
  • John Seddon (1719-1769), English Unitarian divine, born at Lomax Fold, Little Lever, in the parish of Bolton, Lancashire, son of Peter Seddon (1689–1731), dissenting minister at Penrith, Cumberland
  • Felix John Vaughan Seddon (1798-1865), English Orientalist, son of William Seddon, attorney, of Pendleton, near Manchester
  • Thomas Seddon (1821-1856), English landscape painter
  • Richard John Seddon (1845-1906), New Zealand politician, the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand
  • Mark Seddon (b. 1962), British journalist [12]
  • ... (Another 2 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Prince of Wales
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Robert Henry Seddon, British Corporal, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [14]


The Seddon Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: None sino sed dono
Motto Translation: I do not permit, but I give.


  1. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 9th December 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/canada
  4. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 26) America voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1830 with 135 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/america/1830
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 2nd December 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/camden
  6. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The DUKE OF BRONTE 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849DukeOfBronte.htm
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 11th March 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/cornwall
  8. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 5th November 2010). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  9. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  10. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  11. ^ NASA Astronauts Homepage. (Retrieved 2010, September 27) Margaret Seddon. Retrieved from http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/seddon.html
  12. ^ Mark Seddon. (Retrieved 2010, September 27) Mark Seddon. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Seddon
  13. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html
  14. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


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