Saucer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

When the ancestors of the Saucer family emigrated to England following the Norman Conquest in 1066 they brought their family name with them. They lived in Sassy, "in the arrondissement of Avranches, near Pontorsin; sometimes spelt Sacie, and given as Saussai on the Dives Roll. The 'sire de Sassy' figures among the combatants at Hastings in Wace's Roman de Ron.' [1]

Early Origins of the Saucer family

The surname Saucer was first found in Devon and Hereford where "Osbernus de Salceid" and "Radulphus de Salceit," were barons as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. [2] The latter's descendants quickly spread to many parts of the country.

The Pipe Rolls include a listing for Ralph de Saci in Gloucestershire (1155-1158) and Rogo de Saci held the Bishop of Winchester 1189-1190. At about the same time, Robert de Salceio was listed in Buckinghamshire as was William de Salceio in Oxfordshire. Kiddington in Oxfordshire came into their possession soon after the Conquest.

It is supposed that the old church of Kiddington (of which the chancel only is now left) was built by one of them in the reign of Stephen; and they presented to this church, as well as to that of Asterley, in 1221 and 1232. About the year 1200, Sibill de Saucey married Richard de Willescote, or Williamscote, who, dying before or during 1232, left his son Thomas heir.

"They were a family of high rank and distinction, though unnoticed in history, and were seized of very considerable lands and jurisdictions, not only in Oxfordshire, but in Buckinghamshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Herefordshire and Northamptonshire, where I am of opinion that Salcey Forest took its name from them." [1]

"In Leicestershire Anketin de Saucey gave his name to Newbold-Saucey, a parcel of the fee of Harcourt ; and Overton-Saucey passed to Simon de Saucey from the Bernevilles. The heir of Robert de Saucey held, in 1240, of the Honour de Ferrers; and Simon, in 1287, was a benefactor of Ouston Abbey ; his son Robert and his grandson Robert confirmed the grant. Their residence was in the neighbourhood of Newbold, at Saucey, or Sauvay Castle, between Laund and Withcote; afterwards the seat of Lord Basset of Weldon. In old deeds the name is sometimes written Salcey." [1]

Newbold-Saucy is now a lost village in Leicestershire. We do known that a chapel was built there in the 12th century but the chapel was active in 1361 when it was noted that mass was to be celebrated there four times a week.

Early History of the Saucer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Saucer research. Another 291 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1224, 1221, 1324, 1296, 1214 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Saucer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Saucer Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Saucer has been recorded under many different variations, including Saucy, Sauser, Saucer, Sassy, Saussaye, Sausse, Sassy, Sassie, de la Sausseys, Saucer, Sauser, Sasser, Saussays, Sauchy, Caucer and many more.

Early Notables of the Saucer family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Saucer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Saucer family to Ireland

Some of the Saucer family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Saucer migration to the United States +

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Saucers were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Saucer Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Rich Saucer, who arrived in Virginia in 1662 [3]

Australia Saucer migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Saucer Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Samuel Saucer, (Crump), British Convict who was convicted in Birmingham, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Eden" on 12th March 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Island) [4]


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 15th December 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/eden


Houseofnames.com on Facebook