Robbins History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The first people to use the name Robbins were a family of Strathclyde- Britons who lived in the Scottish/English Borderlands. The name comes from when someone lived in Peeblesshire. The Robbins surname was also a patronymic name created from the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert.

Early Origins of the Robbins family

The surname Robbins was first found in Peeblesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd nam Pùballan), former county in South-central Scotland, in the present day Scottish Borders Council Area, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Robbins family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Robbins research. Another 55 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Robbins History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Robbins Spelling Variations

Surnames that evolved in Scotland in the Middle Ages often appear under many spelling variations. These are due to the practice of spelling according to sound in the era before dictionaries had standardized the English language. Robbins has appeared as Robbins, Robbyns, Robens, Robins, Robin and others.

Early Notables of the Robbins family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Robbins Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Robbins migration to the United States +

The North American colonies beckoned, with their ample land and opportunity as their freedom from the persecution suffered by so many Clan families back home. Many Scots even fought against England in the American War of Independence to gain this freedom. Recently, clan societies have allowed the ancestors of these brave Scottish settlers to rediscover their familial roots. Among them:

Robbins Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Samuel Robbins, who settled in New England in 1635
  • John Robbins, who landed in Connecticut in 1638 [1]
  • Richard Robbins, who arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1643 [1]
  • Edward Robbins, who settled in Virginia in 1646
  • Edward Robbins, who arrived in Virginia in 1646 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Robbins Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Robbins, who arrived in New England in 1703 [1]
Robbins Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mary Robbins, who landed in Massachusetts in 1813 [1]
  • James Robbins, who arrived in New York in 1824 [1]
  • Nathaniel Robbins, who arrived in Texas in 1835 [1]
  • Peter Robbins, who landed in Mobile, Ala in 1848 [1]
  • L Robbins, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Robbins migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Robbins Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Lemuel Robbins, aged 35, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Condor" in 1838

Australia Robbins migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Robbins Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Richard Robbins, English convict from Wiltshire, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on April 1st, 1822, settling in New South Wales, Australia [2]
  • Georgeania Robbins, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Mariner" in 1847 [3]
  • George Robbins, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajah" in 1849 [4]
  • Jesse Robbins, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajah" in 1849 [4]
  • John Robbins, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajah" in 1849 [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Robbins migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Robbins Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Emily Beatrice Robbins, (b. 1859), aged 7 months, English settler, from Warwickshire travelling from London aboard the ship "Robert Small" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 29th January 1860 [5]
  • Mrs. Eleanor Robbins, (b. 1833), aged 26, English settler, from Warwickshire travelling from London aboard the ship "Robert Small" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 29th January 1860 [5]
  • Mr. Loftus Robbins, (b. 1833), aged 26, English labourer, from Warwickshire travelling from London aboard the ship "Robert Small" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 29th January 1860 [5]
  • Miss Ellen Eliza Robbins, (b. 1855), aged 4, English settler, from Warwickshire travelling from London aboard the ship "Robert Small" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 29th January 1860 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Robbins (post 1700) +

  • Dan Robbins (1926-2019), American co-inventor of Paint by Numbers, painting kits that were the craze starting the late 1950s using the slogan “Every Man a Rembrandt!”
  • Josiah Robbins (1761-1850), American politician, New Hampshire State Representative
  • Irvine Robbins (1917-2008), American co-founder of the Baskin-Robbins ice cream parlor chain
  • Marty Robbins (1925-1982), stage name of Martin David Robinson, American two-time Grammy Award winning singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1982
  • Kelly Robbins (b. 1969), American professional LGPA golfer
  • Timothy Francis "Tim" Robbins (b. 1958), American Academy Award winning actor, screenwriter, director, producer, activist and musician
  • Charles Armington Robbins (1884-1970), American politician, 22nd Governor of Idaho
  • Laila Robbins (b. 1959), American two-time Academy Award winning stage, film and television actress
  • Harold Robbins (b. 1916), American novelist who has written over 25 bestsellers, with over 750 million copies in 32 languages
  • Robyn Robbins (b. 1951), American founding member of the Bob Seger Silver Bullet Band
  • ... (Another 9 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Hood
  • Mr. Robert S Robbins (b. 1922), English Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from West Bromwich, Staffordshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [6]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Cecil Frank Robbins (d. 1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [7]


The Robbins Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vivit post funera virtus
Motto Translation: Virtue lives after death


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1822 with 190 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1822
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MARINER 1847. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1847Mariner.htm
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAJAH 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Rajah.htm
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  6. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  7. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html


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