Rawlins History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Rawlins is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The name Rawlins came from the Norman given name Radulphus. [1] This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol. Alternatively, the name could have been a baptismal name as in "the son of Rowland" which is pronounced Rawland and Rolland in Furness and Cumberland, "where a large family of Rawlinsons has sprung up, undoubtedly descendants of Rowland through Rawlandson." [2]

Early Origins of the Rawlins family

The surname Rawlins was first found in Oxfordshire where William Raulyn was listed at Evynsham in 1290. A few years later, John Rawlynes was found in Warwickshire in 1343. Almost two hundred years later, Richard Rawlinson was listed in Yorkshire in 1538. [3]

The Rawlin, Rawline and Rawling spellings have been frequent in Scotland since the 16th century. Concentrated in Dumfriesshire, one of the first records was David Rawlynge who held a "botha seu opella" in Dumfries, 1588. Marcus Raulling was listed in Glencapill in 1630, Catherine Railing in Dumfries, 1642, and Thomas Rawling of Dumfries, 1696. [4] Some of the family were far to the south in Lansalloes, Cornwall where "the family of Rawlings" held titles. [5]

Early History of the Rawlins family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rawlins research. Another 121 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1536, 1523, 1536, 1508, 1521, 1620, 1670, 1576, 1631, 1610, 1647, 1708, 1705, 1706, 1679, 1690, 1755 and are included under the topic Early Rawlins History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Rawlins Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Rawlins has been recorded under many different variations, including Rawlings, Rawlins, Rawlington, Rawlinson and others.

Early Notables of the Rawlins family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Rawlins (died 1536), English cleric, Bishop of St David's (1523-1536) and Warden of Merton College, Oxford (1508-1521); Thomas Rawlins (c.1620-1670), an English medallist and playwright; John Rawlinson (1576-1631), an English churchman and academic who was principal of St Edmund Hall, Oxford from 1610; Sir Thomas Rawlinson (1647-1708), Lord Mayor of the City of...
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rawlins Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Rawlins Ranking

In the United States, the name Rawlins is the 4,169th most popular surname with an estimated 7,461 people with that name. [6]

Ireland Migration of the Rawlins family to Ireland

Some of the Rawlins family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Rawlins migration to the United States +

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Rawlinss were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Rawlins Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Joan Rawlins, who settled in Salem in 1630 with her husband John
  • Thomas and Mary Rawlins, who settled in Salem in 1630 with their five children
  • James Rawlins, who arrived in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1632 [7]
  • Jasper Rawlins, who landed in New England in 1633 [7]
  • Joseph Rawlins, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1634 [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Rawlins Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Thomas C Rawlins, who arrived in Mobile County, Ala in 1840 [7]
  • Robert V Rawlins, who arrived in Arkansas in 1859 [7]

Australia Rawlins migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Rawlins Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Abigail Rawlins, British Convict who was convicted in Bristol, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Experiment" on 4th December 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [8]
  • Mr. Thomas Rawlins, British Convict who was convicted in Bedford, Bedfordshire, England for life, transported aboard the " Dunvegan Castle" on 13th March 1830, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [9]
  • Mr. Thomas Rawlins, English convict who was convicted in Bedford, Befordshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Burrell" on 22nd July 1830, arriving in New South Wales [10]
  • Miss Eliza Rawlins, English Convict who was convicted in Stafford, Staffordshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atwick" on 28 September 1837, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [11]
  • Miss Grace Rawlins, (b. 1828), aged 21, Cornish dressmaker from Perranarworthal, Cornwall, UK departing from Plymouth on 17th August 1849 aboard the ship "Royal George" arriving in Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia on 28th November 1849 [12]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Rawlins migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Rawlins Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Mark Rawlins, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Mersey" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th June 1861 [13]
  • Mrs. Jane Rawlins, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Mersey" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th June 1861 [13]
  • Mr. Sydney Rawlins, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Mersey" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th June 1861 [13]
  • Thomas Rawlins, aged 28, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Schiehallion" in 1872

West Indies Rawlins migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [14]
Rawlins Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Henry Rawlins, aged 25, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [7]
  • Mr. John Rawlins, (b. 1617), aged 18, British settler traveling aboard the ship "Matthew" arriving in St Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635 [15]
  • Mr. Henry Rawlins, (b. 1610), aged 25, British settler travelling aboard the ship "Expedition" arriving in Barbados in 1636 [16]
Rawlins Settlers in West Indies in the 18th Century
  • Ama Rawlins, who settled in St. Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1775

Contemporary Notables of the name Rawlins (post 1700) +

  • William D. Rawlins, American Republican politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1942 [17]
  • Wilbur F. Rawlins, American politician, Prohibition Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 12th District, 1918; Prohibition Candidate for New York State Assembly from New York County 21st District, 1919 [17]
  • Joseph Lafayette Rawlins (1850-1926), American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to U.S. Congress from Utah Territory, 1893-95; Defeated, 1894; U.S. Senator from Utah, 1897-1903 [17]
  • Preston Rawlins, American politician, Member of Georgia State House of Representatives from Telfair County, 1933-34, 1939-40 [17]
  • John Aaron Rawlins (1831-1869), American politician, Secretary of War, 1869; Died in office 1869 [17]
  • Mrs. J. R. Rawlins, American Democratic Party politician, Member of Democratic National Committee from Utah, 1939 [17]
  • I. H. Rawlins, American politician, Member of Pennsylvania State House of Representatives from Blair County, 1875-76 [17]
  • George Rawlins, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arizona, 1940 [17]
  • Veldon Lane Rawlins (b. 1937), American academic, President of the University of North Texas (2010-2014)
  • Joseph Lafayette Rawlins (1850-1926), American politician, delegate from the Territory of Utah and a United States Senator from Utah (1897-1903)
  • ... (Another 14 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Miss Valerie Mary Rawlins (1903-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Mt. Eden, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus; she died in the crash [18]


The Rawlins Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cognosce teipsum et disce pati
Motto Translation: Know thyself, and learn to suffer.


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  6. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 22nd March 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/coromandel-and-experiment
  9. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 12th August 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/dunvegan-castle
  10. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 5th November 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/burrell
  11. ^ Convict Records of Australia (Retreived 23rd August 2020, retreived from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/atwick)
  12. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  13. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  14. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  15. ^ Pilgrim Ship's of 1600's (Retrieved October 4th 2021, retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  16. ^ Pilgrim Ship Lists Early 1600's retrieved 29th September 2021. (Retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  17. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 28) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  18. ^ Mount Erebus, Memorial, Roll of Remembrance (Retrieved 2018, February 21st). Retrieved from http://www.erebus.co.nz/memorialandawards/rollofremembrance.aspx


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