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Today's generation of the Rawlings family bears a name that was brought to England by the wave of emigration that was started by the Norman Conquest of 1066. It comes from the Norman given name Radulphus. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol. Alternatively, the name could have been a baptismal name as in "the son of Rowland" which is pronounced Rawland and Rolland in Furness and Cumberland, "where a large family of Rawlinsons has sprung up, undoubtedly descendants of Rowland through Rawlandson." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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The surname Rawlings was first found in Oxfordshire where William Raulyn was listed at Evynsham in 1290. A few years later, John Rawlynes was found in Warwickshire in 1343. Almost two hundred years later, Richard Rawlinson was listed in Yorkshire in 1538. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)

The Rawlin, Rawline and Rawling spellings have been frequent in Scotland since the 16th century. Concentrated in Dumfriesshire, one of the first records was David Rawlynge who held a "botha seu opella" in Dumfries, 1588. Marcus Raulling was listed in Glencapill in 1630, Catherine Railing in Dumfries, 1642, and Thomas Rawling of Dumfries, 1696. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
Some of the family were far to the south in Lansalloes, Cornwall where "the family of Rawlings" held titles. [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Rawlings, Rawlins, Rawlington, Rawlinson and others.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rawlings research. Another 239 words (17 lines of text) covering the years 1536, 1523, 1536, 1508, 1521, 1620, 1670, 1576, 1631, 1610, 1647, 1708, 1705, 1706, 1679, 1690, 1755 and are included under the topic Early Rawlings History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Rawlins (died 1536), English cleric, Bishop of St David's (1523-1536) and Warden of Merton College, Oxford (1508-1521); Thomas Rawlins (c.1620-1670), an English medallist and playwright; John Rawlinson (1576-1631), an English churchman and academic who was principal of St Edmund Hall, Oxford from...

Another 72 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rawlings Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Some of the Rawlings family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 109 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Many English families emigrated to North American colonies in order to escape the political chaos in Britain at this time. Unfortunately, many English families made the trip to the New World under extremely harsh conditions. Overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the stormy Atlanti c. Despite these hardships, many of the families prospered and went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the United States and Canada. Early North American immigration records have revealed a number of people bearing the name Rawlings or a variant listed above:

Rawlings Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Christopher Rawlings settled in Virginia in 1639
  • Christopher Rawlings, who arrived in Virginia in 1639
  • John Rawlings settled in Virginia in 1642
  • Rowland Rawlings, who arrived in Maryland in 1651
  • William Rawlings, who landed in Maryland in 1661
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Rawlings Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Ether Rawlings, aged 3, arrived in New York in 1868
  • Honor Rawlings, aged 11, landed in New York in 1868
  • James Rawlings, aged 5, arrived in New York in 1868
  • Prudence Rawlings, aged 47, arrived in New York in 1868
  • Richard Rawlings, aged 45, landed in New York in 1868
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Rawlings Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Edward Rawlings, a bricklayer, arrived in New South Wales, Australia sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Harriet Rawlings arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Prince George" in 1838
  • Isaac Rawlings arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Prince George" in 1838
  • William Rawlings arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Prince George" in 1838
  • Margaret Rawlings arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Prince George" in 1838
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Rawlings Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Eliza Rawlings, aged 22, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Edward Rawlings, aged 2, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Thomas Rawlings, aged 1, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Eliza Rawlings, aged 9 mths., arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Jane Rawlings, aged 21, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
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  • John William "Red" Rawlings (1892-1972), American Major League Baseball second baseman and shortstop who played from 1914 to 1926, World Series Champion (1921)
  • Donnell Rawlings (b. 1970), American actor and comedian, best known as a cast member on the Comedy Central sketch comedy TV series Chappelle's Show
  • David Todd Rawlings, American guitarist, best known as the musical partner of bluegrass singer-songwriter Gillian Welch
  • Howard Peters Rawlings (1937-2003), American Democrat politician, Member of Maryland State House of Delegates District 40, 1979-2003; Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1988, 1996, 2000
  • George C. Rawlings Jr., American Democrat politician, Candidate for U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1970
  • George Rawlings, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1988
  • Frank H. Rawlings, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1952
  • Calvin W. Rawlings, American Democrat politician, Utah Democratic State Chair, 1937-39; Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1940, 1952
  • Isaac Rawlings, American politician, Mayor of Memphis, Tennessee, 1829-31, 1833-36
  • James Wilson Rawlings (b. 1929), American politician, U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe, 1986-89
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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cognosce teipsum et disce pati
Motto Translation: Know thyself, and learn to suffer.

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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
  2. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  3. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  4. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  5. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  6. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  7. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  8. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  9. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  10. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  11. ...

The Rawlings Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Rawlings Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 24 June 2016 at 11:26.

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