Raeburn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Raeburn family

The surname Raeburn was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Raeburn family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Raeburn research. Another 85 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1300, 1331, 1468, and 1544 are included under the topic Early Raeburn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Raeburn Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Ryburn, Raeburn, Rayburn, Reburn, Reyburn and others.

Early Notables of the Raeburn family (pre 1700)

Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Raeburn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Raeburn migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Raeburn Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William James Raeburn, (Charles), British convict who was convicted in Richmond, North Yorkshire, England for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Cornwall" on 28th February 1851, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [1]

New Zealand Raeburn migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Raeburn Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Raeburn, Scottish settler travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Robert Henderson" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 3rd September 1860 [2]
  • Mrs. Raeburn, Scottish settler travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Robert Henderson" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 3rd September 1860 [2]
  • Mr. Raeburn, Scottish settler with 3 daughters travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Robert Henderson" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 3rd September 1860 [2]
  • Mr. Thomas S. Raeburn, (b. 1850), aged 24, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Peter Denny" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 26th July 1874 [2]
  • Mrs. Emily Raeburn, (b. 1850), aged 24, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Peter Denny" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 26th July 1874 [2]

Contemporary Notables of the name Raeburn (post 1700) +

  • Paul Raeburn (b. 1950), American science writer
  • Boyd Raeburn (1913-1966), American jazz bandleader and bass saxophonist
  • Daniel Raeburn, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1952 [3]
  • Sir Henry Raeburn (1756-1823), Scottish portrait painter, born at Stockbridge, then a suburb of Edinburgh, often referred to as 'The Scottish Reynolds'
  • Harold Raeburn (1865-1926), Scottish mountaineer
  • Julieon Raeburn (b. 1978), Trinidadian athlete
  • Anna Raeburn (b. 1944), British broadcaster and journalist
  • Raeburn VanBuren (1891-1987), American magazine and comic strip illustrator
  • Raeburn van Buren (1891-1987), American magazine and comic strip illustrator

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. R A  Raeburn (1890-1917), American Chief Steward aboard the SS Curaca from New York, USA who died in the explosion [4]
Ibrox disaster
  • Walter Robert Raeburn (1935-1971), Scottish football supporter, from Edinburgh who was at the Ibrox disaster on 2nd January 1971 when a human crush among the crowd killed 66 and injured 200 people he died of his injuries [5]


The Raeburn Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Robur in Deo
Motto Translation: God is our strength.


  1. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 11th March 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/cornwall
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 26) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  4. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  5. ^ Bradford City Football Club In memory (retrieved 22nd March 2021). Retrieved from https://www.bradfordcityafc.com/club/in-memoriam/


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