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Prang History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Boernician-Scottish Prang family lived in a place near Stow Roxburghshire, called Hopringle or Pringle. As such, Prang is a habitation name, a category of surnames that were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. The place name comes from the Old English word hop which referred to an "enclosed valley," and Prjónn, an Old Norse name comprised of components which mean peg and ravine. Thus, the original bearer of the surname came from an area noted for an enclosed valley or a ravine.

Early Origins of the Prang family


The surname Prang was first found in Roxburghshire, where the first Chief on record was Robert de Hoppryngil who witnessed a deed by King Alexander III of Scotland in 1250 A.D. Forty-six years later, Ellys Obringkel was Bishop of St. Andrews, and rendered homage to King Edward I of England on his brief conquest of Scotland in 1296. His seal bore a hunting horn. About this time they acquired the Clan territories near Stow and they became close allies of the Black Douglases.

Early History of the Prang family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Prang research.
Another 664 words (47 lines of text) covering the years 1368, 1406, 1200, 1450, 1455, 1455, 1485, 1976, 1707, 1789, 1834, 1580 and 1626 are included under the topic Early Prang History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Prang Spelling Variations


Spelling rules had not yet evolved in medieval Scotland, some names dating from that era often appear many different ways. Some spelling variations of Prang include Pringle, Pringell, Prindle, Hopringle and others.

Early Notables of the Prang family (pre 1700)


Notable among the family at this time was Sir Robert Pringle of Stitchill. Sir John Pringle (1707-82), Scottish physician and reformer, doctor to the Royal Family including King George III, the so-called "mad king" who has been called the "father of military medicine;" Also about this time, Thomas Pringle (1789-1834) Scottish...
Another 55 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Prang Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Prang family to Ireland


Some of the Prang family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Prang family to the New World and Oceana


The Boernician-Scottish people who came to North America were often nearly penniless when they arrived, and brought very few personal effects with them. Much Scottish heritage was lost in the process, and it is only this century that highland games, Clan societies, and other patriotic Scottish organizations have helped the ancestors of Scots to rediscover their national legacy. Prangs were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Prang Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Herman Prang, who landed in New York in 1709 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name Prang (post 1700)


  • Jeffrey Prang, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 2000 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 13) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

Prang Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 13) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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