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Peabodey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancestors of the Peabodey family brought their name to England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They lived in Hertfordshire. The name, however, is a reference to Pabode, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. It has also been suggested that Peabody began as a nickname which marked a person by some physical characteristic, but, while this does seem probable, no convincing etymological derivation has been discovered to support this idea.

Early Origins of the Peabodey family


The surname Peabodey was first found in Hertfordshire, but we must take a moment to pass on a rather ridiculous origin of the name that this author agrees is rather 'far-fetched.' "The same as Paybody. Dixon derived it from Pae-body, 'one as handsome as a pae or peacock!' This is far-fetched enough for the ordinary belief, but Mr. Arthur goes much further, in deducing the lineage of the name from one Boadie, a kinsman of Queen Boadices, who escaped into Wales, and there got the name of Pea, or mountain, prefixed to his name !!" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

After that distraction, we must seriously explore the origin of the distinguished name. "Pabode held a fief from the see of Durham, temp. William I. He was probably of Flemish origin. Henry Pappede held this fief 1165 and from him descended the family of Pappady, Pabody or Peabody, from which [descend] the celebrated philanthropist of the name." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)


Early History of the Peabodey family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Peabodey research.
Another 169 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 108 and 1086 are included under the topic Early Peabodey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Peabodey Spelling Variations


Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Peabodey were recorded, including Peabody, Paybody and others.

Early Notables of the Peabodey family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Peabodey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Peabodey family to the New World and Oceana


The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Peabodey arrived in North America very early: Francis Peabody settled in Hampton in New Hampshire in 1630; Lieutenant Francis Peabody settled in Topsfield in Massachusetts; George Peabody settled in Philadelphia.

The Peabodey Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Murus aeneus consienta sana
Motto Translation: A sound conscience is a wall of brass.


Peabodey Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)

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