Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Orgill History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



In Scottish history, few names go farther back than Orgill, whose ancestors lived among the clans of the Pictish tribe. The ancestors of the Orgill family lived in the lands of Cargill in east Perthshire where the family at one time had extensive territories.


Early Origins of the Orgill family


The surname Orgill was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland. Cargill is a parish containing, with the villages of Burreltown, Wolfhill, and Woodside. "This place, of which the name, of Celtic origin, signifies a village with a church, originally formed a portion of the parish of Cupar-Angus, from which, according to ancient records, it was separated prior to the year 1514." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Further to the south Cowgill is an ecclesiastical district, in the parochial chapelry of Dent, parish and union of Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Johannes de Colgyll and Alicia de Colgyll as holding lands there at that time. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Early History of the Orgill family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Orgill research.
Another 107 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1283, 1457, 1681, 1685, 1619, 1681, 1638, 1643 and 1681 are included under the topic Early Orgill History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Orgill Spelling Variations


Although Medieval Scotland lacked a basic set of spelling rules, which meant that scribes recorded names according to their sounds it was not uncommon for the names of a father and son to be recorded differently. As a result, there are many spelling variations of Scottish single names. Orgill has been written Cargill, Cargille, Carnigill, Cargile, Kergylle, Cargyle, Carrigle, McGirl and many more.

Early Notables of the Orgill family (pre 1700)


Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Orgill Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Orgill family to Ireland


Some of the Orgill family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Orgill family to the New World and Oceana


Thousands of Scots left their home country to travel to Ireland or Australia, or to cross the Atlantic for the North American colonies. The difficult crossing was an enormous hurdle, but those who survived found freedom and opportunity in ample measure. Some Scots even fought for their freedom in the American War of Independence. This century, their ancestors have become aware of the illustrious history of the Scots in North America and at home through Clan societies and other organizations. Passenger and immigration lists show many early and influential immigrants bearing the name Orgill:

Orgill Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Tyrell Orgill, aged 9, who landed in America, in 1893
  • Lucy Orgill, aged 64, who immigrated to the United States, in 1894
  • Bernard C. Orgill, aged 51, who landed in America, in 1896

Orgill Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Janette Elizabeth Orgill, aged 41, who immigrated to the United States from Kingston, in 1903
  • John Churtra Orgill, aged 10, who settled in America from Kingston, in 1903
  • Joseph Orgill, aged 8, who landed in America from Kiltimagh, Ireland, in 1907
  • Margaret Orgill, who settled in America, in 1907
  • Maria Orgill, aged 10, who immigrated to the United States from Kiltimagh, Ireland, in 1907
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Orgill (post 1700)


  • Edmund Orgill, eponym of the Edmund Orgill Trophy awarded to the winner of the annual football game between Rhodes College and Sewanee: The University of the South, Tennessee
  • Dever Orgill (b. 1990), Jamaican footballer

The Orgill Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Domino confido
Motto Translation: Confide in the Lord.


Orgill Family Crest Products



Related Stories



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Sign Up