Neagle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Neagle is derived from the Norman surname de Angulo. The Gaelic form of this surname is de Nógla.

Early Origins of the Neagle family

The surname Neagle was first found in at Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, SW Wales, where they held a family seat from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. The Neagle surname arrived Cork, where Gilbert D'Angulo accompanied Strongbow into Ireland in 1172.

Early History of the Neagle family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Neagle research. Another 59 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1689, 1757, 1830, 1508, 1536, 1541, 1719, 1784, 1636, 1699, 1686, 1691 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Neagle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Neagle Spelling Variations

Medieval scribes and church officials spelled the names as they sounded, so a name was often spelled many different ways during the lifetime of a single person. The investigation of the origin of the name Neagle revealed many spelling variations including Nagle, Nangle, Neagle, Naigle, Naegle, Naigel, Nagell, Nagele, Naegell, Naigel, Naigell, Nagale, Naigall, Nanegle, Nangel, Nangell, Nangale, Naingale, Naingel, Naingle, O'Nagel, O'Nagle, O'Naigle and many more.

Early Notables of the Neagle family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family up to this time was Thomas Nangle, 15th Baron of Navan; and his son, John Nangle, 16th Baron of Navan (died before 1508), an Irish nobleman and courageous soldier who fought with distinction at the Battle of Knockdoe; Richard Nangle D.D., Irish prelate of the Provincial of the Order of Saint Augustine, Bishop of Clonfert (1536-1541); Nano...
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Neagle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Neagle migration to the United States +

Ireland experienced a dramatic decrease in its population during the 19th century. This was in a great measure, a response to England's imperialistic policies. Hunger and disease took the lives of many Irish people and many more chose to leave their homeland to escape the horrific conditions. North America with its promise of work, freedom, and land was an extremely popular destination for Irish families. For those families that survived the journey, all three of these things were often attained through much hard work and perseverance. Research into early immigration and passenger lists revealed many immigrants bearing the name Neagle:

Neagle Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Peter Neagle, who arrived in Maryland in 1672 [1]
Neagle Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Patrick Neagle, who landed in Virginia in 1723 [1]
  • Fredrck William Neagle, aged 24, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1740 [1]
Neagle Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • William Neagle, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]
  • George, Jeremiah, John, Mary, Patrick, and Richard Neagle all, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860
  • Rich'd Neagle, aged 24, who landed in America from Ireland, in 1893
  • Ann Neagle, aged 21, who landed in America from Ireland, in 1894
  • James Neagle, aged 23, who settled in America, in 1896
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Neagle Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • John Neagle, aged 21, who settled in America from Limerick, in 1902
  • Thomas Neagle, aged 12, who immigrated to the United States, in 1904
  • John Neagle, aged 35, who landed in America, in 1904
  • John Neagle, aged 24, who immigrated to the United States from Glasgow, in 1905
  • Mary Neagle, aged 11, who immigrated to America from Ballingarry, Ireland, in 1907
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Neagle migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Neagle Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Jeremiah Neagle, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1829
  • Catherine Neagle, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1834

Australia Neagle migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Neagle Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Edmond Neagle, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Mary Dugdale" in 1840 [2]
  • George Neagle, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Mary Dugdale" in 1840 [2]
  • James Neagle, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Mary Dugdale" in 1840 [2]
  • James Neagle, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Monsoon"
  • Mary Neagle, aged 20, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Caucasian" [3]

New Zealand Neagle migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Neagle Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Mary Ann Neagle, (b. 1838), aged 21, English domestic servant from Middlesex travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Victory " arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 14th May 1859 [4]
  • Bridget Neagle, aged 18, a servant, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "La Hogue" in 1874
  • Mary Neagle, aged 16, a servant, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "La Hogue" in 1874
  • Mr. John Neagle, (b. 1857), aged 21, Irish farm labourer from Kerry departing on 10th August 1878 aboard the ship "Hydaspes" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 9th November 1878

Contemporary Notables of the name Neagle (post 1700) +

  • John Henry "Jack" Neagle (1858-1904), American Major League Baseball pitcher
  • John Neagle (1796-1865), American portrait painter
  • Dennis Edward "Denny" Neagle Jr. (b. 1968), retired American Major League Baseball pitcher
  • Lamar Justin Neagle (b. 1987), American soccer player
  • J. L. Neagle, American politician, Delegate to South Carolina State Constitutional Convention from York County, 1868 [5]
  • Lynne Neagle AM (b. 1968), Welsh Labour & Co-operative politician
  • Merv Neagle (b. 1958), retired Australian rules footballer
  • Dame Anna Neagle DBE (1904-1986), born Florence Marjorie Robertson, British stage and film actress and singer
  • Jay Neagle (b. 1988), Australian rules footballer

HMS Repulse
  • Mr. John Neagle (b. 1906), British Stoker 1st Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [6]


The Neagle Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non vox sed votum
Motto Translation: Not in voice but a wish.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MARY DUGDALE 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840MaryDugdale.gif
  3. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 26 April 1853. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Caucasian 1857. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/caucasian1857.shtml
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 12) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  6. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate