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Nangle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The surname Nangle is derived from the Norman surname de Angulo. The Gaelic form of this surname is de Nógla.

Early Origins of the Nangle family


The surname Nangle was first found in at Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, SW Wales, where they held a family seat from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. The Nangle surname arrived Cork, where Gilbert D'Angulo accompanied Strongbow into Ireland in 1172.

Early History of the Nangle family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Nangle research.
Another 117 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1689, 1757, 1830, 1508, 1536, 1541, 1719, 1784, 1636, 1699, 1686, 1691 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Nangle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Nangle Spelling Variations


During the lifetime of an individual person, his name was often spelt by church officials and medieval scribes the way it sounded. An examination of the many different origins of each name has revealed many spelling variations for the name: Nagle, Nangle, Neagle, Naigle, Naegle, Naigel, Nagell, Nagele, Naegell, Naigel, Naigell, Nagale, Naigall, Nanegle, Nangel, Nangell, Nangale, Naingale, Naingel, Naingle, O'Nagel, O'Nagle, O'Naigle and many more.

Early Notables of the Nangle family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family up to this time was Thomas Nangle, 15th Baron of Navan; and his son, John Nangle, 16th Baron of Navan (died before 1508), an Irish nobleman and courageous soldier who fought with distinction at the Battle of Knockdoe; Richard Nangle D.D., Irish prelate of the Provincial of...
Another 71 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Nangle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Nangle family to the New World and Oceana


In the mid-19th century, Ireland experienced one of the worst periods in its entire history. During this decade in order to ease the pressure of the soil, which was actually depleted by the effects of the previous years' grain crops, landowners forced tenant farmers and peasants onto tiny plots of land that barely provided the basic sustenance a family required. Conditions were worsened, though, by the population of the country, which was growing fast to roughly eight million. So when the Great Potato Famine of the mid-1840s hit, starvation and diseases decimated the population. Thousands of Irish families left the country for British North America and the United States. The new immigrants were often accommodated either in the opening western frontiers or as cheap unskilled labor in the established centers. In early passenger and immigration lists there are many immigrants bearing the name Nangle:

Nangle Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Peter Nangle, aged 40, who landed in New York, NY in 1803 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Charles, Edward, John, and Martin Nangle all, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860

Nangle Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mr. Timothy Nangle, aged 26 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Lord Ashburton" departing 13th September 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 1st November 1847 but he died on board [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 91)

Contemporary Notables of the name Nangle (post 1700)


  • Christine Nangle, American five-time Primetime Emmy Award nominated writer and actress, known for Saturday Night Live (1975), Inside Amy Schumer (2013) and Kroll Show (2013)
  • Jennifer Nangle, American award winning producer and actress, known for Spirit Board (2015), Demonic Attachment (2015) and Coat Room (2014)
  • David M. Nangle, American contemporary state legislator serving in the Massachusetts House of Representatives
  • John Francis Nangle (1922-2008), United States federal judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri
  • Perry F. Nangle, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1924
  • John Joseph Nangle (1891-1960), American Democrat politician, Treasurer of Missouri Democratic Party, 1933-42; Member of Democratic National Committee from Missouri, 1947
  • John D. Nangle, American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from New York County 9th District, 1886
  • John Nangle, American Republican politician, Member of Missouri Republican State Committee, 1967; Delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1972
  • Romello Desmond Camar Nangle (b. 1995), English footballer

The Nangle Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non vox sed votum
Motto Translation: Not in voice but a wish.


Nangle Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 91)

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