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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The Mustard surname is thought to derived from the Middle English/Old French word "moustarde," meaning "mustard." It has been suggested that the name was originally occupational, for a dealer in spices; or perhaps a nickname for someone with a hot temper or a vicious tongue.

Mustard Early Origins



The surname Mustard was first found in Huntingdon where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having prevailed over King Harold, granted most of Britain to his many victorious Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a Bishop, with 60 or more Lordships scattered throughout the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to distinguish him from the senior stem of the family. After many rebellious wars between his Barons, Duke William, commissioned a census of all England to determine in 1086, settling once and for all, who held which land. He called the census the Domesday Book, [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
indicating that those holders registered would hold the land until the end of time. Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of lands in Huntingdon who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086. Although popular authors of surname origins attribute this name to the spice, it is most likely totally unrelated and more likely a Flemish import at the time of the Conquest. This is reasonably confirmed that the use of mustard in Britain started only in 1720 when Mrs Clements of Durham invented the table form of the spice.

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Mustard Spelling Variations


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Mustard Spelling Variations



Spelling variations of this family name include: Mustard, Mostart, Mussard, Moussard, Moussart and others.

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Mustard Early History


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Mustard Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mustard research. Another 175 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mustard History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Mustard Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Mustard Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Mustard Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Mustard Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Elizabeth Mustard, who came to Pennsylvania in 1773

Mustard Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Archibald Mustard, who came to Philadelphia in 1840
  • Alexander Mustard, who came to New York, NY in 1854
  • Donald Mustard, aged 36, who landed in America from Southampton, in 1897

Mustard Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • W. C. Mustard, aged 36, who emigrated to the United States, in 1903
  • Robert Mustard, aged 56, who landed in America from Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1909
  • Annie Mustard, aged 44, who emigrated to the United States from Sunderland, England, in 1909
  • Catherine Mustard, aged 52, who settled in America from Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1909
  • Donald Mustard, aged 51, who emigrated to the United States from Elgin, Scotland, in 1912
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Mustard Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Mr. John Mustard U.E. who settled in Eastern District [Cornwall], Ontario c. 1786 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

Mustard Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Donald Mustard, who settled in Ontario in 1855
  • Alexandre W. Mustard, who arrived in Ontario in 1871

Mustard Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

  • Alex Mustard, aged 37, who landed in Toronto, Canada, in 1908
  • Vernon Ralph Mustard, aged 32, who emigrated to Montreal, Canada, in 1919

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Contemporary Notables of the name Mustard (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Mustard (post 1700)



  • Daniel "Homeless" Mustard (b. 1975), American singer-songwriter and musician
  • Elmer Mustard (b. 1940), American 13th Fire Commissioner of the City of New York
  • Chad Mustard (b. 1977), former American NFL football tight end and offensive tackle from Central City, Nebraska
  • Lewis W. Mustard, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1908
  • James H. Mustard, American Republican politician, Member of Michigan Republican State Central Committee, 1919
  • Philip Mustard (b. 1982), English cricketer from Sunderland
  • John "Jack" Mustard (1926-1938), English professional association football winger
  • Lieutenant Ernest Andrew Mustard (1893-1971), Australian World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories
  • William Thorton Mustard OC MBE (1914-1987), Canadian physician and cardiac surgeon who developed the "Mustard operation" used in orthopedics and and the "Mustard cardiovascular procedure"
  • Dr. James Fraser Mustard CC OOnt FRSC (1927-2011), Canadian physician and scientist from Toronto, inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

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Mustard Family Crest Products


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Mustard Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

Other References

  1. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  3. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  5. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  6. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  7. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  8. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  9. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  10. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  11. ...

The Mustard Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Mustard Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 2 March 2016 at 13:23.

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