Mulloy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Irish name Mulloy was originally written in a Gaelic form as O Maolmhuaidh, which is derived from the word "muadh," which has the dual meaning of "noble" and "big and soft." [1]

Early Origins of the Mulloy family

The surname Mulloy was first found in County Offaly (Irish: Uíbh Fháilí) originally the Kingdom of Uí Failghe, located in central Ireland in the Province of Leinster, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Albin O'Molloy or Alpin O'Moelmhuaidh (d. 1223), was Bishop of Ferns, a native Irishman, "who became a Cistercian monk at Baltinglass, and eventually rose to be abbot of that house. In Lent 1186, when John, archbishop of Dublin, held a synod at Holy Trinity Church, Albin preached a long sermon on clerical continency, in which he laid all the blame for existing evils on the Welsh and English clergy who had come over to Ireland. On 5 Nov. he was appointed by Pope Innocent III, with the Archbishop of Tuam and Bishop of Kilmacduagh, to excommunicate the Bishop of Waterford, who had robbed the Bishop of Lismore." [2]

Early History of the Mulloy family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mulloy research. Another 149 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1110, 1660, 1641, 1652, 1640, 1690, 1663, 1669, 1667, 1767, 1764, 1767, 1742, 1702 and 1758 are included under the topic Early Mulloy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mulloy Spelling Variations

Those scribes in Ireland during the Middle Ages recorded names as they sounded. Consequently, in this era many people were recorded under different spellings each time their name was written down. Research on the Mulloy family name revealed numerous spelling variations, including Molloy, Mulloy, Miley, O'Molloy, O'Mulloy, Mullee and many more.

Early Notables of the Mulloy family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family at this time was John O'Molloy of English parish, Sugawn chief, Lord of Fercal (Feara Ceall), Offaly Francis Molloy or O'Maolmhuaidh ( fl. 1660), was an Irish theologian and grammarian, a native of the county of Meath, Ireland. "The family of which he was a member had extensive landed possessions in the district known as O'Molloys' Country, and some of them engaged actively in the Irish movements from 1641 to 1652." [2] Charles Molloy (1640-1690), was an Irish lawyer of the Middle Temple, born in County Offaly. He was "a native of King's County and was probably a member of...
Another 154 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mulloy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Mulloy migration to the United States +

Thousands of Irish families left for North American shores in the 19th century. These people were searching for a life unencumbered with poverty, hunger, and racial discrimination. Many arrived to eventually find such conditions, but many others simply did not arrive: victims of the diseased, overcrowded ships in which they traveled to the New World. Those who lived to see North American shores were instrumental in the development of the growing nations of Canada and the United States. A thorough examination of passenger and immigration lists has disclosed evidence of many early immigrants of the name Mulloy:

Mulloy Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James Mulloy, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1822 [3]
  • Thomas Mulloy, who arrived in New York in 1832
  • Mary Mulloy, who arrived in New York, NY in 1845 [3]
  • Michael Mulloy, who landed in New York, NY in 1845 [3]
  • John Mulloy, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1849 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Mulloy migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Mulloy Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Mulloy U.E. who settled in Eastern District, Lancaster [South Glengarry], Ontario c. 1784, then relocated to Vaughan, Ontario [4]
  • William Mulloy, a Loyalist, who settled in Ontario, Canada from America in 1796
Mulloy Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • George Mulloy, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1831
  • Catharine Mulloy, who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834
  • Mary Mulloy, aged 25, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Sea Horse" from Galway, Ireland
  • Daniel Mulloy, aged 24, a farmer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Perseus" in 1834
  • Ellen Mulloy, aged 18, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Perseus" in 1834
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Mulloy migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Mulloy Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Mulloy, British settler travelling from London, UK aboard the ship "Bank of England" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 28th December 1855 [5]
  • Mr. William Mulloy, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Tamar" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 28th January 1858 [6]
  • Mrs. Ellen Mulloy, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Tamar" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 28th January 1858 [6]

Contemporary Notables of the name Mulloy (post 1700) +

  • Gardnar Mulloy (1913-2016), American former No. 1 tennis tennis player, winner of the US Open (1942, 1945, 1946, 1948) and Wimbledon Championships (1957), inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame in 1972
  • William Theodore Mulloy (1892-1959), American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church, Bishop of Covington (1945-1959)
  • William Thomas Mulloy Jr. (1917-1978), American anthropologist, best known for his studies of Polynesian prehistory
  • Michael Mulloy (d. 2007), Irish musician, member of The Mulloy Brothers, a traditional Irish ballad group
  • Martin Mulloy (d. 2010), Irish musician, member of The Mulloy Brothers, a traditional Irish ballad group
  • Shelia Mulloy, née O'Malley, Irish writer and historian
  • Phil Mulloy (b. 1948), British Edinburgh International Film Festival award winning and British Film Institute Award winning animator
  • Daniel Mulloy, British three-time BAFTA award winning and three-time Edinburgh International Film Festival award winning artist and filmmaker


The Mulloy Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Malo mori quam foedari
Motto Translation: I would rather die than be disgraced.


  1. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Supplement to Irish Families. Baltimore: Genealogical Book Company, 1964. Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  6. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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