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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2017


Scottish history reveals Muiry was first used as a surname by the Strathclyde-Briton people. It was a name for someone who lived near a moor, or heath. In Gaelic, Mor means great or big; therefore, a scribe may have mistaken the adjective Mor as a surname More or Muir. This may explain the occurrence of the surname Muir, or a variant in Northern Scotland. The name Muir would seem out of place in that region because it holds a meaning of "living by a moor or heath," not the typical landscape of the highlands. Judging by its meaning, Muir is a local name of the south that described the area, in which the original bearer lived or held land.

Muiry Early Origins



The surname Muiry was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the census rolls taken by the ancient Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

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Muiry Spelling Variations


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Muiry Spelling Variations



It is only in the last few hundred years that rules have developed and the process of spelling according to sound has been abandoned. Scottish names from before that time tend to appear under many different spelling variations. Muiry has been spelled Muir, Mure, Moor, Moore, Mure, More, Moorman and many more.

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Muiry Early History


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Muiry Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Muiry research. Another 317 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1291, 1300, 1296, 1700, 1407, 1393, 1397, 1594, 1657, 1887 and 1959 are included under the topic Early Muiry History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Muiry Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Muiry Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable amongst the family at this time was Robert More II (died 1407), of Pamber, Hampshire, English politician, appointed High Sheriff of Hampshire for 1393-94, elected a Member of Parliament for Hampshire in 1397; Sir William...

Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Muiry Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Muiry In Ireland


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Muiry In Ireland



Some of the Muiry family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 155 words (11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Unwelcome in their beloved homeland, many Scots sailed for the colonies of North America. There, they found land and freedom, and even the opportunity to make a new nation in the American War of Independence. These Scottish settlers played essential roles in the founding of the United States, and the shaping of contemporary North America. Among them: George Muir (Moore) who was banished to New Jersey from Scotland in 1685; James Muir and his wife and children, who settled in Georgia in 1732; Colin Moore, listed as a Scot banished to the American colonies in 1747.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Duris non frangor
Motto Translation: I am not disheartened by difficulties.


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Muiry Family Crest Products


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Muiry Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    2. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
    3. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
    4. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    5. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
    6. Fulton, Alexander. Scotland and Her Tartans: The Romantic Heritage of the Scottish Clans and Families. Godalming: Bramley, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-86283-880-0).
    7. Adam, Frank. Clans Septs and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands 8th Edition. London: Bacon (G.W.) & Co, 1970. Print. (ISBN 10-0717945006).
    8. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
    9. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    10. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. Acts of Malcom IV 1153-65 Volume I Regesta Regum Scottorum 1153-1424. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1960. Print.
    11. ...

    The Muiry Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Muiry Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 15 July 2013 at 14:50.

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