Mernary History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Mernary family

The surname Mernary was first found in Essex where they held a family seat. They were descended from the great and noble Marinni (Mareigni or Mairinni) family of Calvados, in the arrondisement of Bayeux in Normandy where Gwerri de Marinni in 1166 held half a knight's fee at Adam de Port of Mapledurwell. [1]

Robert de Mareigni was granted lands in Essex in 1168. About this time, the family name changed to de Marny. William held in 1207 and 1284. [1]

Another source gives more details. "This family held Layer Marney, in Essex, from the time of Henry II. to that of Henry VIII. The first mentioned is 'William de Marney, who about the year 1166 held a knight's fee under Henry de Essex, of the Honour of Hagnet. ' " [2]

At some point, the family branched to the parish of St. Mabyn, in Cornwall. "The manor of Colquite or Kilquite is mentioned in Doomsday as Chilcoit, and is described as one of the 288 manors belonging to the Earl of Moreton. At a subsequent period this was in the family of Serjeaux, by one of whose co-heiresses it was brought in marriage to the Marneys. About the middle of the sixteenth century, John Lord Marney, whose father was created Lord Marney in 1524, built an elegant mansion at Colquite. In this family it remained until it was carried by marriage to the Hoblyns." [3]

Early History of the Mernary family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mernary research. Another 119 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1525, 1513, 1523, 1494, 1621, 1319, 1400, 1369, 1371, 1376, 1377, 1379, 1380, 1382, 1383, 1384, 1386 and 1390 are included under the topic Early Mernary History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mernary Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: de Marney, Marney, Marnie, Marny, Marny, Marnet, Marnay, Marner and many more.

Early Notables of the Mernary family (pre 1700)

Another 47 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mernary Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Mernary migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Mernary Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Elizabeth A. Mernary, (b. 1859), aged 19, Cornish settler departing on 18th November 1878 aboard the ship "Boyne" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 26th February 1879 [4]
  • Miss Emily P. Mernary, (b. 1864), aged 14, Cornish settler departing on 18th November 1878 aboard the ship "Boyne" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 26th February 1879 [4]
  • Miss Jane Mernary, (b. 1854), aged 24, Cornish settler departing on 18th November 1878 aboard the ship "Boyne" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 26th February 1879 [4]
  • Miss Jane Mernary, (b. 1878), aged 3 months, Cornish settler departing on 18th November 1878 aboard the ship "Boyne" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 26th February 1879 [4]
  • Miss Martha J. Mernary, (b. 1861), aged 17, Cornish settler departing on 18th November 1878 aboard the ship "Boyne" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 26th February 1879 [4]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  3. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  4. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf


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