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McQuiggan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The McQuiggan surname appeared in Gaelic as Mag Uiginn, which is probably derived from a Norse forename. The name is usually pronounced as "McGwiggen" in it's homeland County Tyrone (especially around Omagh).

Early Origins of the McQuiggan family


The surname McQuiggan was first found in County Tyrone (Irish:Tír Eoghain), the ancient territory of the O'Neills, now in the Province of Ulster, central Northern Ireland, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the McQuiggan family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McQuiggan research.
Another 141 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1800, 1616 and 1659 are included under the topic Early McQuiggan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McQuiggan Spelling Variations


Just like the English language, the Gaelic language of Ireland was not standardized in the Middle Ages. Therefore, one's name was often recorded under several different spellings during the life of its bearer. Spelling variations revealed in the search for the origins of the McQuiggan family name include MacGuigan, MacGoogan, MacGougan,MacGookin, MacGuckin, MacGugan, MacQuiggan, MacWiggin, MacGucken, MacGuckian, MacGuiggan, MacGuighan and many more.

Early Notables of the McQuiggan family (pre 1700)


Another 20 words (1 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McQuiggan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McQuiggan family to the New World and Oceana


Irish families left their homeland in astonishing numbers during the 19th century in search of a better life. Although individual reasons vary, most of these Irish families suffered from extreme poverty, lack of work opportunities, and exorbitant rents in their homeland. Many decided to travel to Australia or North America in the hopes of finding greater opportunities and land. The Irish immigrants that came to North America initially settled on the East Coast, often in major centers such as Boston or New York. But like the many other cultures to settle in North America, the Irish traveled to almost any region they felt held greater promise; as a result, many Irish with gold fever moved all the way out to the Pacific coast. Others before that time left for land along the St. Lawrence River and the Niagara Peninsula, or the Maritimes as United Empire Loyalists, for many Irish did choose to side with the English during the American War of Independence. The earliest wave of Irish migration, however, occurred during the Great Potato Famine of the 1840s. An examination of early immigration and passenger lists has revealed many people bearing the McQuiggan name:

McQuiggan Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Bernard McQuiggan, aged 19, who arrived in New York in 1893 aboard the ship "Germanic" from Liverpool & Queenstown [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6BN-8WG : 6 December 2014), Bernard McQuiggan, 03 Jun 1893; citing departure port Liverpool & Queenstown, arrival port New York, ship name Germanic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Mich McQuiggan, aged 51, originally from Tyrone, Ireland arrived in New York in 1893 aboard the ship "Ethiopia" from Glasgow, Scotland [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J61X-B6P : 6 December 2014), Mich McQuiggan, 05 Apr 1893; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Ethiopia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Bridget McQuiggan, aged 49, originally from Tyrone, Ireland arrived in New York in 1893 aboard the ship "Ethiopia" from Glasgow, Scotland [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J61X-B65 : 6 December 2014), Bridget McQuiggan, 05 Apr 1893; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Ethiopia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Lettie Mc Quiggan, aged 28, originally from Glasgow, Scotland, who arrived in New York in 1897 aboard the ship "State of Nebraska" from Glasgow, Scotland [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX46-3JW : 6 December 2014), Lettie Mc Quiggan, 27 Oct 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name State of Nebraska, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

McQuiggan Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Elizabeth McQuiggan, aged 39, originally from Glasgow, Scotland, who arrived in New York in 1923 aboard the ship "Columbia" from Glasgow, Scotland [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNNN-63G : 6 December 2014), Elizabeth McQuiggan, 08 Jan 1923; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Columbia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Contemporary Notables of the name McQuiggan (post 1700)


  • John A. McQuiggan, American producer, known for his work on Hidden in This Picture
  • Keith McQuiggan, American production assistant, known for his work on Romeo Mu who played at the 1994 FA Women's Cup Final
  • Penny McQuiggan, American actress, known for Blood Slaves of the Vampire Wolf (1996)
  • Kelly McQuiggan, Canadian curler from the Richmond Curling Club, Richmond who competed at the 2016 Canadian Direct Insurance BC Men's Curling Championship
  • John McQuiggan, British Higher Executive Officer, Office of the Deputy High Commissioner for the United Kingdom in Lahore, Pakistan made Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in 1955

The McQuiggan Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Semper patriae servire presto
Motto Translation: Always ready to serve my country


McQuiggan Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6BN-8WG : 6 December 2014), Bernard McQuiggan, 03 Jun 1893; citing departure port Liverpool & Queenstown, arrival port New York, ship name Germanic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J61X-B6P : 6 December 2014), Mich McQuiggan, 05 Apr 1893; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Ethiopia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J61X-B65 : 6 December 2014), Bridget McQuiggan, 05 Apr 1893; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Ethiopia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX46-3JW : 6 December 2014), Lettie Mc Quiggan, 27 Oct 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name State of Nebraska, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNNN-63G : 6 December 2014), Elizabeth McQuiggan, 08 Jan 1923; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Columbia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

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