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McKeragle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The chronicles of the McKeragle family reach back into Scottish history to an ancient tribe known as the Picts. The ancestors of the McKeragle family lived in the lands of Cargill in east Perthshire where the family at one time had extensive territories.


Early Origins of the McKeragle family


The surname McKeragle was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland. Cargill is a parish containing, with the villages of Burreltown, Wolfhill, and Woodside. "This place, of which the name, of Celtic origin, signifies a village with a church, originally formed a portion of the parish of Cupar-Angus, from which, according to ancient records, it was separated prior to the year 1514." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Further to the south Cowgill is an ecclesiastical district, in the parochial chapelry of Dent, parish and union of Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Johannes de Colgyll and Alicia de Colgyll as holding lands there at that time. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Early History of the McKeragle family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McKeragle research.
Another 107 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1283, 1457, 1681, 1685, 1619, 1681, 1638, 1643 and 1681 are included under the topic Early McKeragle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McKeragle Spelling Variations


When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became standardized. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they were written. McKeragle has been written Cargill, Cargille, Carnigill, Cargile, Kergylle, Cargyle, Carrigle, McGirl and many more.

Early Notables of the McKeragle family (pre 1700)


Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McKeragle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McKeragle family to Ireland


Some of the McKeragle family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McKeragle family to the New World and Oceana


The crossing to North America did not seem so great in comparison with the hardships many Scots endured at home. It was long, expensive, and cramped, but also rewarding. North America offered land and the chance for settlers to prove themselves in a new place. And many did prove themselves as they fought to forge a new nation in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of those Scots can now experience much of their once-lost heritage through the Clan societies and highland games that have sprung up across North America in the last century. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important, early immigrants to North America bearing the name of McKeragle: David Cargill arrived who in New York State in 1740; with James, Jean, John, Margaret; Elizabeth Cargill settled in New York State in 1740; J. and William Cargill settled in Baltimore Maryland in 1820..

The McKeragle Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Domino confido
Motto Translation: Confide in the Lord.


McKeragle Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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