McGuffie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The rugged western mountains of Scotland's coastline and the Hebrides islands were home to the ancestors of the McGuffie family. McGuffie was originally a name for a dark-featured, peaceful person. The Gaelic name of the Clan is Mac Dubhshithe, which translates as black one of peace. One branch of the Clan on the island of North Uist was known as Dubh-sidh, meaning 'black fairy,' due to their whimsical association with the faerie folk.

Early Origins of the McGuffie family

The surname McGuffie was first found in on the Isle of Colonsay, where the eponymous ancestor of the Clan may be Dubhshith, also called Dubside, who was lector at the Cathedral on the sacred isle of Iona in 1164. As the name MacFee is one of the oldest of all Dalriadan surnames it appears in records as early as the reign of Alexander II, when Johannes Macdufthi was witness to a charter in Dumfriesshire. In 1296, Thomas Macdoffy swore an oath of allegiance to the king.

Early History of the McGuffie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McGuffie research. Another 226 words (16 lines of text) covering the year 1838 is included under the topic Early McGuffie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McGuffie Spelling Variations

Spelling variations are a very common occurrence in records of early Scottish names. They result from the repeated and inaccurate translations that many names went through in the course of various English occupations of Scotland. McGuffie has been spelled MacFie, McFey, MacFee, MacDuffie, MacPhee, MacGuffie, MacCuffie, MacPhie, Maffie, Maffey, MacDubh-shithe (Gaelic) and many more.

Early Notables of the McGuffie family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early McGuffie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the McGuffie family to Ireland

Some of the McGuffie family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 89 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States McGuffie migration to the United States +

The hardy Scots who made the crossing settled all along the east coast of North America and in the great west that was just then opening up. At the time of the American War of Independence, many United Empire Loyalists moved north from the American colonies to Canada. Scottish national heritage became better known in North America in the 20th century through highland games and other patriotic events. An examination of immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name McGuffie arrived in North America very early:

McGuffie Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • A McGuffie, aged 29, who landed in South Carolina in 1812 [1]
  • Anthony McGuffie, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1813 [1]
  • John McGuffie, who landed in Washington County, Pennsylvania in 1866 [1]
  • James McGuffie, aged 19, who arrived in America from Glasgow, Scotland, in 1893
  • Miss Sophie McGuffie, aged 16, who arrived in America, in 1894
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
McGuffie Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Henry Daugal McGuffie, aged 27, who arrived in America from Barbados, in 1901
  • Alex McGuffie, aged 23, who arrived in America from Lockwumoch, Scotland, in 1908
  • Walter McGuffie, aged 20, who arrived in America from Shettleston, Scotland, in 1911
  • Clara McGuffie, aged 16, who arrived in America from Gonaives, Haiti, in 1914
  • William McGuffie, aged 62, who arrived in America, in 1918
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand McGuffie migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

McGuffie Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John McGuffie, (b. 1836), aged 38, Scottish carpenter, from Ayr travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [2]
  • Mrs. Mary McGuffie, (b. 1837), aged 37, Scottish settler, from Ayr travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [2]
  • Miss Agnes McGuffie, (b. 1860), aged 14, Scottish settler, from Ayr travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [2]
  • Miss Catherine McGuffie, (b. 1863), aged 11, Scottish settler, from Ayr travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [2]
  • Miss Mary McGuffie, (b. 1865), aged 9, Scottish settler, from Ayr travelling from Glasgow aboard the ship "Oamaru" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 17th February 1875 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name McGuffie (post 1700) +

  • Samuel Terrence McGuffie (b. 1989), American college football wide receiver
  • Louis McGuffie VC (1893-1918), Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross
  • Ryan McGuffie (b. 1980), Scottish professional association footballer
  • Bill McGuffie (1927-1987), British Ivor Novello Award winning pianist, film composer and conductor who toured with Benny Goodman on his European tours


The McGuffie Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro Rege
Motto Translation: For the King.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate