Maund History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Maund is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Maund family lived in Derbyshire. The name, however, is a reference to the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Mundeyville, Normandy where they inhabited the Abbey of Fecamp. [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Maund family

The surname Maund was first found in Derbyshire where "the Mundys of Marheaton, who trace their pedigree to temp. Edward I., have a tradition of Norman descent, from a place called the abbey of Mondaye. " [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 proved the scattered migration of the family by that time: Simon Moneday, Huntingdonshire; Simon Mundi, Cambridgeshire; and Henry Mundi, Cambridgeshire. [4] In Somerset, Edmund Moneday, was listed there temp. Edward III. [5]

Further to the south in Cornwall, another branch of the family was found in the manor of Rialton in the hundred of Pyder. "In the days of Elizabeth, a previous compact having expired, Rialton, another manor, and the bailiffry of the hundred of Pyder, were leased out either to Richard Senhouse, or to Mr. Munday, the son of a Mr. Munday, who had previously acted as steward from the time of Henry VIII. It is certain that the Munday family continued from the reign of Elizabeth to be lessees under the crown until the year 1663, when the Mundays were succeeded by Sir Francis Godolphin." [6]

Early History of the Maund family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Maund research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1584, 1657, 1529, 1591, 1555, 1630, 1560, 1633, 1685 and 1739 are included under the topic Early Maund History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Maund Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Mundy, Mondy, Monday, Munday, Mundie and others.

Early Notables of the Maund family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Mundy (c. 1529-1591), an English composer of sacred music; and his son, John Mundy (c. 1555-1630), English composer and organist; Anthony Munday...
Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Maund Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Maund migration to the United States +

Because of the political and religious discontent in England, families began to migrate abroad in enormous numbers. Faced with persecution and starvation at home, the open frontiers and generally less oppressive social environment of the New World seemed tantalizing indeed to many English people. The trip was difficult, and not all made it unscathed, but many of those who did get to Canada and the United States made important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers with Maund name or one of its variants:

Maund Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Nicholas Maund, who arrived in America in 1760-1763 [7]

New Zealand Maund migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Maund Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Richard Maund, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Whitby" in 1841
  • Mary Ann Maund, aged 35, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Robert Maund, aged 13, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Thomas Maund, aged 11, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • Alexander Maund, aged 9, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lloyds" in 1842
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Maund (post 1700) +

  • Joseph Bernard Maund, American politician, Member of Georgia State House of Representatives from Talbot County, 1941-46 [8]


The Maund Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deus providebit
Motto Translation: God will provide.


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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