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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Origins Available: English, Scottish


Mannam is a name of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the Old English personal name Manning. According to some experts, this name is derived from the Old Norse word manningi, which means a valiant man. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
Another source claims that the surname was an "ancient personal name." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
However, one source claims that name was an ancient Norman name that must have moved to England at some point. Lambert Maignon was listed in Normandy in 1180 and a few years later, William, Ansketel le Maignen was also found in Normandy 1180-1185. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)


Mannam Early Origins



The surname Mannam was first found in Suffolk and later in various counties throughout England. "The Mannings were, in the 13th century, represented by the Manings in Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Lincolnshire, et c. Now they have their principal homes in Essex and Devon, and are also established in Cheshire, Northampton shire, and Gloucestershire." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
"The oldest record of the family occurs in Domesday [Book] as Mannig (Suffolk)" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Henry Maninge in Cambridgeshire; and Nicholas Mannyng in Kent. Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list Johannes Mannyng and Nora Mannyng. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

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Mannam Spelling Variations


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Mannam Spelling Variations



Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Mannam have been found, including Manning, Maning, Mannings and others.

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Mannam Early History


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Mannam Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mannam research. Another 314 words (22 lines of text) covering the years 1300, 1630 and 1711 are included under the topic Early Mannam History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Mannam Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Mannam Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Mannam Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Mannam In Ireland


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Mannam In Ireland



Some of the Mannam family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 106 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Mannam, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were : Anne and Edmund Maning, who settled in New England in 1635; Peter, John, Joan and Jane Maning settled in Virginia in 1635; Joseph, Jacob, Margaret, Mary, Sarah and Thomas Manning all settled in Boston in 1679.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Esse quam videri
Motto Translation: To be, rather than to seem.


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Mannam Family Crest Products


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Mannam Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.

Other References

  1. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  2. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  3. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  4. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  5. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  6. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  7. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  8. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  9. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  10. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  11. ...

The Mannam Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Mannam Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 8 December 2016 at 13:44.

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