Mainord History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Mainord is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The name Mainord came from the Germanic personal name Mainard, which is composed of the elements magin, which means strength, and hard, which means hardy, brave or strong. [1]

Two sources note entries in the Domesday Book of 1086. The first notes that " 'Mainardus homo Rogeri Pictavensis,' is mentioned in the Domesday as an under-tenant in Essex and Lincolnshire; and either he or another of the name held Wilts, Hants, and Norfolk, before the Conquest. The early notices of the name are scanty. 'In the hydarium of Henry III. Maynard was certified to hold one hide and half in 'Cherleton' (Charlton), but as the paramountcy of the estate is withheld, no clue is furnished for tracing it to the Domesday lord." [2]

The second notes Meinardus uigil in Norfolk in the Domesday Book. [3] Presumably both entries are related but translations from ancient Latin to English are not consistent.

Early Origins of the Mainord family

The surname Mainord was first found in Suffolk at Hoxne, a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Hoxne. "Hoxne Hall, for many generations the residence of the Maynard family. In the north aisle [of the church] is a monument, with a group of figures finely sculptured in marble, to the memory of Sir Thomas Maynard, erected in 1742, by Christopher Stanley, Esq. A school, now in union with the National Society, was founded and endowed by Lord Maynard." [4]

"The pedigree of the Viscounts Maynard commences in the 14th century with John Mainard of Axminster in Devonshire, who served in France under the Black Prince, and was appointed Constable of Brest in 1352. Sixth in descent from him we find another John Maynard, sitting in Queen Mary's first Parliament as Burgess for St. Albans, and numbered among thirty-nine stout Protestants who were indicted in the King's Bench for absenting themselves from the House rather than join in accepting the Pope's authority in the realm." [2]

Early record were also found in Scotland. "Bishop Robert was about to set the municipal machinery of St. Andrews in motion (c. 1144) he obtained from the king the services of Mainard, a burgess of Berwick: 'Be it known that with the licence of David our king, I have constituted St. Andrews a burgh and that with the king's consent I have made Mainard the Fleming (Matnardum Flandrensem) provost of this burgh'. Robert Mainard was one of the witnesses to a charter by John de Dundemor to the Priory of May in 1260." [5]

Early History of the Mainord family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mainord research. Another 98 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1180, 1589, 1640, 1635, 1640, 1640, 1640, 1623, 1699, 1642, 1718, 1663, 1679, 1641, 1685, 1685, 1577, 1614, 1611, 1602, 1690, 1638, 1662, 1660, 1690, 1775, 1763 and 1769 are included under the topic Early Mainord History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mainord Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Mainord has been recorded under many different variations, including Maynard, Mainard and others.

Early Notables of the Mainord family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Maynard, 1st Baron Maynard (c.1589-1640), an English politician, Lord Lieutenant of Essex (1635-1640), Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire (1640) and Custos Rotulorum of Essex in 1640; William Maynard, 2nd Baron Maynard (1623-1699); Banastre Maynard, 3rd Baron Maynard (c 1642-1718), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Essex (1663-1679); Sir William Maynard, 1st Baronet (1641-1685), an English...
Another 63 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mainord Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Mainord family to Ireland

Some of the Mainord family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mainord family

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Mainords were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: Kingsmill Maynard settled in Virginia in 1663; James Maynard was banished from the west of England to Barbados in 1685; Nicholas Maynard settled with his wife and five children and servants in Barbados in 1680.


Contemporary Notables of the name Mainord (post 1700) +

  • Carlos Mainord, American Defensive Backs coach for the 2001 Carolina Panthers
  • Amanda Mainord, American beauty pageant contestant in the 1987 Miss Louisiana competition
  • Jack Mainord (d. 1998), American former co-owner of WKXM (1300 AM), an American radio station serving the community of Winfield, Alabama
  • Mildred Mainord, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940 [6]
  • Marcia Mainord, American Democrat politician, Member, Credentials Committee, Democratic National Convention, 2008 [6]


The Mainord Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Manus justa nardus
Motto Translation: A just hand is a precious ointment.


  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  6. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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