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Ludlam History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Ludlam is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from a family once having lived on a hill beside a babbling river which was later referred to as Ludlow Ludlam is a topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. Habitation names form the other broad category of surnames that were derived from place-names. They were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. Other local names are derived from the names of houses, manors, estates, regions, and entire counties.

Early Origins of the Ludlam family


The surname Ludlam was first found in Shropshire at Ludlow, a market town close to the Welsh border and in the Welsh Marches. The first listing of the place name dates back to 1138 where it was listed as Ludelaue and literally meant "hill or tumulus by a rapid," derived from the Old English words hlude + hlaw. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Ludlow was called by the Britons Dinam, or "the palace of princes," and by the Saxons Leadlowe, and Ludlowe. One reference claims Robert de Montgomery, kinsman of the Conqueror, fortified the town with walls, and erected most of its stately castle in which he lived until his death in 1094. Yet another reference claims the castle was built by Walter de Lacy in the late 11th century as possession of Ludlow Castle descended through the Lacy family until 1115. Mother Ludlam's Cave or Mother Ludlum's Hole is a small cave in the sandstone cliff of the Wey Valley at Moor Park, near Farnham, Surrey. The earliest record of the place occurs when a monk named Symon found a spring rising in the cave in the 13th century. Mother Ludlam was claimed to be a white witch who lived in the cave. Her cauldron has been kept in Frensham Church nearby for centuries.

Early History of the Ludlam family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ludlam research.
Another 137 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1590, 1664, 1634, 1617, 1692, 1551, 1588, 1680 and 1728 are included under the topic Early Ludlam History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ludlam Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Ludlam has been recorded under many different variations, including Ludlow, Ludley, Ludloe and others.

Early Notables of the Ludlam family (pre 1700)


Notables of this surname at this time include: Roger Ludlow (1590-1664), an English lawyer, magistrate, military officer, and colonist who helped found the Colony of Connecticut, he directed Boston's first fortification, Castle William in 1634; Edmund Ludlow (Ludlowe) (c. 1617-1692), an English parliamentarian, best known for his involvement...
Another 47 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ludlam Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ludlam family to Ireland


Some of the Ludlam family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 55 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ludlam family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Ludlam or a variant listed above:

Ludlam Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Richard Ludlam, who arrived in South Carolina in 1723 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Ludlam Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Alfred Ludlam, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Alfred Ludlam, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "London" in 1840
  • George Ludlam, aged 25, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864
  • Ellen Ludlam, aged 24, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864

Contemporary Notables of the name Ludlam (post 1700)


  • James Ludlam, American businessman who built the Ludlam Building, a Greek Revival styled building in Oyster Bay, New York
  • Charles Braun Ludlam (1943-1987), American actor, director, and playwright, posthumously inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 2009
  • Robert J. Ludlam, American Democrat politician, Candidate for New York State Assembly from Nassau County 2nd District, 1922 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Richard S. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1847 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Providence Ludlam, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1860; Member of New Jersey State Senate from Cumberland County, 1863-68 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Patience R. Ludlam, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1940 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Lillian Ludlam, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1972 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Jesse D. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1880, 1883-85 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Furman L. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1895-96 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • William Ludlam (1717-1788), English clergyman and mathematician
  • ... (Another 5 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Ludlam Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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