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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


The history of the name Leblanc goes back the Medieval period, to that region of France known as Normandy. This name was given to a person who was "blanc" or in English "white." It was no doubt originally given to someone either because of their blond hair or because of a reputation for purity and piety.

Leblanc Early Origins



The surname Leblanc was first found in Normandy (French: Normandie), the former Duchy of Normandy, where this ancient family were part of the Royal House of Blois and held a family seat with lands, titles, estates and manors. Members of this family were the hereditary Barons of Bailleul of Norman Conquest fame, and who assisted Duke William of Normandy, head of the House of Blois, in his conquest of England in 1066. Members of this distinguished and Royal family branched to many locations throughout Europe and amongst the locations were: Silesia, Holland, Italy and Britain. Perhaps the oldest of the name was Blanche of Navarre (1226-1283), also known as Blanche of Champagne, was the daughter of Theobald the Troubador, King of Navarre and Count of Champagne, and his second wife Agnes of Beaujeu. Blanche of Navarre (French: Blanche d'Évreux) (1330-1398) was Queen consort of France as the wife of King Philip VI of France. Blanche I (1387-1441) was Queen of Navarre from 1425 to 1441 and her daughter Blanche II of Navarre (1424-1464), was titular Queen of Navarre (1461-1464) and by marriage Princess of Asturias.

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Leblanc Spelling Variations


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Leblanc Spelling Variations



French surnames were subject to numerous alterations in spelling because of the various cultural groups that inhabited specific regions. Eventually, each region possessed its own local dialect of the French language. The early development of the French language, however, was also influenced by other languages. For example, Old French was infused with Germanic words and sounds when barbarian tribes invaded and settled in France after the fall of the Roman Empire. Middle French also borrowed heavily from the Italian language during the Renaissance. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Leblanc is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Leblanc, Lebland, Leblang, Le Blanc, Blanc, Blanche, Blanchet, Blancheteau, Blancheton, Blanchonnet, Blanchot, Blanchaud, Blanquet, Blancot, Bianchi, Blanchecappe, Blanchecotte, Le Blank, Blank, Blanque, Blanke, Blancke and many more.

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Leblanc Early History


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Leblanc Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Leblanc research. Another 255 words (18 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Leblanc History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Leblanc Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Leblanc Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Leblanc Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



French settlers came early to North American, following in the wake of the explorers, and creating New France. Quebec City, founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain is said to have been the first American site founded as a permanent settlement, rather than as just a commercial outpost. But emigration was slow, in 1643, 109 years after the first landings by Cartier, there were only about 300 French people in Quebec, and by 1663, when the region was officially made The Royal Colony of New France, by Louis XIV, there still only around 500 settlers. Over 2,000 would arrive during the next decade. Early marriage was desperately encouraged amongst the immigrants. Youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted immigrants, both noble and commoner from France. By 1675, there were around 7000 French in the colony, and by that same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported to Louisiana. Despite the loss of the Colony to England, the French people flourished in Lower Canada. Among settlers to North America of the Leblanc surname were

Leblanc Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Hubert LeBlanc, aged 25, landed in Louisiana in 1720
  • Josetta Leblanc, who arrived in South Carolina in 1755-1756
  • Claude LeBlanc, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1755-1768
  • Magdaleine Leblanc, who arrived in South Carolina in 1755-1756
  • Magdeleine Cormier Leblanc, who landed in South Carolina in 1755-1756
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Leblanc Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century

  • Andre Leblanc, who landed in Canada in 1632-1760
  • Nicolas Leblanc, aged 22, arrived in Canada in 1642
  • Jean Leblanc, who arrived in Montreal in 1659

Leblanc Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Jean Leblanc, who landed in Quebec in 1766-1767
  • Joseph Leblanc, who landed in Quebec in 1766-1767
  • Augustin Leblanc, who landed in Quebec in 1766-1767
  • Pierre Leblanc, who arrived in Quebec in 1766-1767
  • Simon Leblanc, who arrived in Quebec in 1766-1767
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Contemporary Notables of the name Leblanc (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Leblanc (post 1700)



  • Daniel Wallace LeBlanc (1931-2013), American jurist to the Louisiana Court of Appeals
  • Wade Matthew LeBlanc (b. 1984), American Major League Baseball pitcher
  • Fred Saugrain LeBlanc Sr. (1897-1969), American Democrat politician, Mayor of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1941-44; Louisiana State Attorney General, 1944-48, 1952-56; District Judge in Louisiana 19th District, 1959-69
  • Edward LeBlanc, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1940, 1952
  • Dudley J. LeBlanc, American Democrat politician, Member of Louisiana State Senate, 1950
  • Daniel G. LeBlanc, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1996, 2000, 2004; Member of Democratic National Committee from Virginia, 2004
  • Collette LeBlanc, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 2008
  • Carew S. LeBlanc, American Republican politician, Candidate in primary for Delegate to Michigan State Constitutional Convention from Gratiot County, 1961
  • Arthur J. LeBlanc, American politician, Socialist Labor Candidate for Presidential Elector for Massachusetts, 1956
  • Honore LeBlanc, American Democrat politician, Candidate in primary for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Nashua 8th Ward, 1938
  • ... (Another 13 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Leblanc Historic Events


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Leblanc Historic Events




Halifax Explosion

  • Mr. George  LeBlanc, Canadian resident from Levis, Quebec, Canada who died in the Halifax Explosion on 6th December 1917

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sans tache
Motto Translation: Without stain.


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Leblanc Family Crest Products


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Leblanc Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0192852213).
    2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    3. Rupp, Daniel L. A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French and Other Immigrants to Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776. Baltimore. Print.
    4. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
    5. Vaillancourt, Emile. La Conquete du Canada par les Normands. Biographie de la premiere generation Normande du Canada. Montreal: G. Ducharme, 1930. Print.
    6. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
    7. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    8. de la Porte, A. Tresor Heraldique. Paris: F. Casterman, 1864. Print.
    9. Rietstap, Johannes Baptist. Armorial Général. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
    10. Conrad, Glenn R. The First Families of Louisiana. Baton Rouge LA: Claitor's Publishing, 1970. Print.
    11. ...

    The Leblanc Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Leblanc Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 25 August 2016 at 08:49.

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