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Leathown History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Anglo-Saxon name Leathown comes from when the family resided in Latham in the West Riding of Yorkshire, in Lathom in Lancashire and Laytham in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The place-name Latham was originally derived from the Old Norse word hlathum, which is the plural form of hlath, which means a barn. Therefore the original bearers of the Leathown surname were dwellers at the barns. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
[2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Early Origins of the Leathown family


The surname Leathown was first found in Lancashire at Lathom, a village and civil parish about 5 km northeast of Ormskirk. The place name dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it was listed as Latune [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
and later as Lathum in 1200, and Lathom in 1223. One of the earliest records of the name was Robert Fitzhenry de Lathom who held lands throughout south Lancashire in 1189. The lands were "bestowed by Robert de Lathom upon the newly-founded priory of Burscough in 1189." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].

Presumably one of his descendants, Robert de Lathom in 1292 was sued by Richard, son of John de Burscough concerning a tenement in Burscough, but the case was non-suited." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].

"This place was the seat of the Lathom family, of whom Robert de Lathom, in the reign of Edward I., received the grant of a weekly market and an annual fair, and whose baronial mansion of Lathom House, remarkable for its extent and magnificence, and formidable for its strength, afterwards became so conspicuous in history. " [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

At Whiston in the parish of Prescot, "in the reign of Richard II. the Lathoms had estates here, which descended through several generations; and the Torbocks, of whom the Lathoms were a branch, were, at a very remote period, possessed of Rudgate, in this manor." [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

The parish of Huyton was another ancient family seat. "The Lathoms were early proprietors, being mentioned in the reign of Henry III. The original church was of considerable antiquity, having been granted to the priory of Burscough, at the time of its foundation, by the first (aforementioned) Robert de Lathom." [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Leathown family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Leathown research.
Another 227 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1610, 1677 and are included under the topic Early Leathown History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Leathown Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Leathown has been recorded under many different variations, including Latham, Lathem, Lathom and others.

Early Notables of the Leathown family (pre 1700)


Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Leathown Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Leathown family to Ireland


Some of the Leathown family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 91 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Leathown family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Leathown or a variant listed above: William Latham, who settled in Plymouth Massachusetts in 1620 after arriving on the "Mayflower"; Carey Latham settled came to New London Conn in 1630.

The Leathown Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Aequanimitate
Motto Translation: Equanimity


Leathown Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  5. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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