lavigne History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the lavigne family goes back to the Medieval landscape of northwestern France, to the regions known as Brittany and Normandy. The name Lavigne is derived from the Old French word "vigne," meaning "vine," and as such it is likely that the first bearers of this name owned or worked on a vineyard. [1]

Early Origins of the lavigne family

The surname lavigne was first found in Brittany where they held a family seat in the seigneury of Haute Morays.

They later branched to Houle in that same province. They were closely allied to this latter House of Houlle de Kermassonet. Branching to the region of Tournai they intermarried with the family of Hennebert. Branches were later found in Maine, Le Mans, Bourbonnais, Guyenne, and Artois. In the south of France they held a family seat in the region of Languedoc at Puylaroque.

Joseph Lavigne, son of Pierre and Jeanne (née Gazaille), settled in Contrecoeur, Quebec and married Marie-Anne Gareau on 12th November 1727. [2]

Early History of the lavigne family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our lavigne research. More information is included under the topic Early lavigne History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

lavigne Spelling Variations

The many different spellings of French surnames can be partially explained by the use of local dialects and by the influence of other languages during the early development of the French language. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name lavigne is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Lavigne, Levine, Levin, Levigne, Levigny, Laveine, Lavignes, Lavene, Des Vignes, deVigne, Devignes, Devigne, De lavigne and many more.

Early Notables of the lavigne family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early lavigne Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States lavigne migration to the United States +

Migration from France to New France or Quebec as it was now more popularly called, continued from France until the colony fell to the English in 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, the Acadians were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. In 1793, the remaining French in these provinces came under British rule. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name lavigne were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name lavigne were

lavigne Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Etienne Lavigne, who arrived in Rhode Island in 1686
  • Etienne Lavigne, who landed in Rhode Island in 1686 [3]
lavigne Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Lavigne, who arrived in New Orleans, La in 1813 [3]
  • Jean Baptiste and Joseph Lavigne, who arrived in New Orleans in 1820
  • Alphonse Lavigne, who arrived in Mississippi in 1899 [3]

Canada lavigne migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

lavigne Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Urbain LaVigne, who arrived in Montreal in 1648
  • Jean-Baptiste Lavigne, son of Jacques and Marie, who married Françoise Viau, daughter of Jacques and Marie, in Quebec on 9th June 1699 [4]
lavigne Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Guillaume Lavigne, who arrived in Quebec from Guyenne 1708
  • Guillaume Lavigne, son of Pierre and Marie, who married Marie-Jeanne Parenteau, daughter of Pierre and Madeleine, in Beauport, Quebec on 26th February 1708 [4]
  • Louis-Joseph Lavigne, son of Guillaume and Marie-Jeanne, who married Catherine Girard, daughter of Jean and Marie-Madeleine, in Lorette, Quebec on 29th October 1736 [4]
  • Guillaume-Joseph Lavigne, son of Guillaume and Marie-Jeanne, who married Marie-Josephte Isoir, daughter of Antoine and Marie-Thérèse, in Quebec on 10th September 1736 [4]
  • Joseph Lavigne, who arrived in Quebec from Guyenne in 1739
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name lavigne (post 1700) +

  • Marc Trevor Tessier Lavigne (b. 1960), Canadian-American neuroscientist
  • Steve Lavigne (b. 1962), American comic book illustrator
  • George Henry "Kid" Lavigne (1869-1928), American boxer
  • Thomas Lavigne, American politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 2004 [5]
  • Romeo J. Lavigne, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Hampshire, 1960 [5]
  • Philip Scott Lavigne, American Democrat politician, Candidate for West Virginia State House of Delegates 32nd District, 2010 [5]
  • Joseph Lavigne, American politician, Representative from New York 28th District, 1904 [5]
  • Francis E. Lavigne, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1952, 1956 [5]
  • Francis C. Lavigne, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964 [5]
  • Bernard Lavigne (b. 1959), French judge
  • ... (Another 9 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


  1. ^ Dionne, N.-E., Origine Des Familles Canadiennes-Français. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969. Print.
  2. ^ Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Internoscia, Arthur E., and Claire Chevrier. Dictionnaire National des Canadiens Français 1608-1760. Vol. 2, Institut Drouin, 1958.
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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