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lassetter History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancestry of the name lassetter dates from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It comes from when the family lived in Leicester, in Leicestershire. Leicester is the capital of the county and its name is derived from the Old English element ceaster, which meant "Roman town."

Early Origins of the lassetter family


The surname lassetter was first found in Cheshire at Leycester, more commonly known as Leicester, a city now in the unitary authority area in the East Midlands. The first record of the place name was found in the early 10th century as "Ligera ceater" but by the Domesday Book of 1086 the place name had evolved to Ledecestre. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)

Literally the place name means "Roman town of the people called Ligore," having derived from the Tribal name + the Old English word "ceater." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
As far as the surname is concerned, the family are "descended from Sir Nicholas Leycester, who acquired the manor of Nether-Tabley in marriage, and died in 1295." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Another source notes that the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list what is probably the first instance of the name as Robert de Lestre. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print


Early History of the lassetter family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our lassetter research.
Another 227 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1586, 1604, 1605, 1614 and 1678 are included under the topic Early lassetter History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

lassetter Spelling Variations


Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name lassetter have been found, including Leycester, Leicester, Leister, Lester and others.

Early Notables of the lassetter family (pre 1700)


Another 28 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early lassetter Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the lassetter family to Ireland


Some of the lassetter family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the lassetter family to the New World and Oceana


Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America bore the name lassetter, or a variant listed above: John Leicester, who settled in Virginia in 1732; Peter Leicester settled in Pennsylvania in 1682; James Lester settled in Virginia in 1637; George Lester settled in Charles Town, South Carolina, in 1767.

Historic Events for the lassetter family



RMS Lusitania

  • Lieutenant Frederick Macquarie A. Lassetter, Australian 1st Class Passenger from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking by escaping in a box [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/
  • Mrs. Elisabeth Anne Lassetter, Australian 1st Class Passenger from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking by escaping in a box [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/

The lassetter Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro rege et patria
Motto Translation: For King and country.


lassetter Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  4. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  5. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/

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