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labbet History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Origins Available: English, Irish

The name labbet is rooted in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It is a name for someone who worked as a superior of a monastery, an Abbot. The name labbet may also be a nickname applied to someone who played the part of an abbot in a medieval pageant, or to a person thought to be particularly pious and devout.

Early Origins of the labbet family

The surname labbet was first found in the counties of Oxfordshire, Huntingdon, Bedfordshire and Cambridge from very ancient times. The family was in this area before the Norman Conquest of England by Duke William of Normandy in 1066 AD Alfwoldus Abbas (1111-1117,) is one such example of a man who was a holder of the monasterial office of Abbot. It is also assumed that the name may have been a source of several more surnames at a later date. Walter Abat was recorded in The Assize Rolls for Yorkshire in 1219. Peter le Abbot (the Abbot) of Essex is documented in the records of the Hornchurch priory, and is also mention of Ralph Abbod in the Assize Rolls for Somerset in 1272.

Early History of the labbet family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our labbet research.
Another 115 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1306, 1577, 1912, 1562, 1633, 1612 and 1633 are included under the topic Early labbet History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

labbet Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like labbet are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name labbet include: Abbott, Abbot, Abbotts, Abbett, Abbet, Abott and others.

Early Notables of the labbet family (pre 1700)

Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early labbet Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the labbet family to Ireland

Some of the labbet family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 37 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the labbet family to the New World and Oceana

Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name labbet or a variant listed above: George Abbot of Andover Massachusetts born in Yorkshire died at Andover in 1681. George Abbott emigrated with his three sons and settled in Rowley Massachusetts in 1630. Arthur Abbott settled in Marblehead but removed to Ipswich Massachusetts and joined Winthrop in 1634 in the settlement of that town. Francis Abott settled in New York State in 1853. The early migration of the family is covered in the Abbott genealogy written in 1847.

The labbet Motto

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deo patria amicis
Motto Translation: A friend to God and my country.

labbet Family Crest Products

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