Judge History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

As an Irish surname, Judge was the translation of the Irish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhnaigh. This same name was also anglicized and became MacEvrehoona, MacVrehonne, MacBrehon, and others.

Early Origins of the Judge family

The surname Judge was first found in County Mayo (Irish: Maigh Eo) located on the West coast of the Republic of Ireland in the province of Connacht, where an Eugene MacBrehan was the Bishop of Mayo from 1541-1561. A Malachy MacBrehuna was the Archdeacon of Kilmacduagh. In counties Sligo and in north Roscommon, there were many registrations of the name which showed that many families were using the Judge and Breheny surnames indiscriminately.

Early History of the Judge family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Judge research. Another 99 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1202, 1260, and 1296 are included under the topic Early Judge History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Judge Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Judge, Juge, Jude and others.

Early Notables of the Judge family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Judge Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Judge family to Ireland

Some of the Judge family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 32 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Judge migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Judge Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Richard Judge, who landed in Maryland in 1674 [1]
Judge Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Judith Judge, who settled in New England in 1748
Judge Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Judge, who landed in Alexandria, Va in 1817 [1]
  • Roger Judge, who arrived in New York, NY in 1817 [1]
  • Phillip Judge, who arrived in New York, NY in 1817 [1]
  • Matilda Judge, aged 15, who landed in Mobile, Ala in 1820-1873 [1]
  • James Judge, who landed in New York in 1845 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Judge migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Judge Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mary Judge, aged 19, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Britannia" from Sligo, Ireland
  • Mrs. Bridget Judge, aged 30 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship " Yorkshire Lass" departing from the port of Killala, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle In July 1847 [2]
  • Miss. Margaret Judge, aged 2 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Rankin" departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle In August 1847 [2]
  • Mr. Morris Judge, aged 50 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Clarendon" departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle In July 1847 [2]
  • Miss. Margaret Judge, aged 3 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Marchioness of Breadalbane" departing 11th June 1847 from Sligo, Ireland; the ship arrived on 12th August 1847 but she died on board [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Judge migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Judge Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr.Henry Judge, (b. 1779), aged 40, Irish shoe maker who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Bencoolen" on 24th April 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia before being transferred to Tasmania via the "Admiral Cockburn", he died in 1823 [4]
  • Mr.Thomas Judge, (Joice), (b. 1794), aged 25, Irish servant who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Bencoolen" on 24th April 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia before being transferred to Tasmania via the "Admiral Cockburn" [4]
  • Mr. Frank Judge, English convict who was convicted in Liverpool, Lancastershire, England for 15 years, transported aboard the "Augusta Jessie" on 10th August 1838, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [5]
  • Bernard Judge, Scottish Convict from Scotland, who was transported aboard the "Aboukir" on December 24, 1851, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [6]
  • Jemima Judge, aged 19, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "South Sea"
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Judge migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Judge Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Louisa Judge, (b. 1846), aged 17, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Huntress" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st April 1863 [7]
  • James Judge, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Asterope" in 1870
  • Amos Judge, aged 29, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Bebington" in 1872
  • Isabella Judge, aged 29, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Bebington" in 1872
  • Ellen Judge, aged 6, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Bebington" in 1872
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Judge (post 1700) +

  • Barbara Thomas Judge CBE (1946-2020), Lady Judge, née Singer, American-born, British lawyer and businesswoman, based in London with dual American-British citizenship
  • Bernard Judge (1940-2019), American journalist and manager, known for his work with the City News Bureau of Chicago, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin
  • Thomas Lee Judge (1934-2006), American politician, Governor of Montana in 1972 and re-elected in 1976
  • Patty Judge (b. 1943), American Lieutenant Governor of Iowa from 2007 to 2011
  • William Quan Judge (1851-1896), American (Irish born) theosophist
  • Father Thomas Judge (1868-1933), American born to Irish immigrant parents, ordained as a Vientiane priest in 1899
  • John P. Judge, American politician, Representative from New York 26th District, 1908 [8]
  • John E. Judge, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Iowa, 1940, 1944 [8]
  • James P. Judge, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928 [8]
  • James Judge, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Idaho, 1972 [8]
  • ... (Another 25 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Royal Oak
  • Fernleith G. Judge, British Musician with the Royal Marine aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he survived the sinking [9]
  • Peter Richard Judge (1909-1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [9]


The Judge Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Totum est providentia
Motto Translation: All is providence.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 36)
  3. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 81)
  4. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 5th October 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/bencoolen
  5. ^ Convict Records of Australia (Retrieved 23rd August 2020, Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/augusta-jessie)
  6. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 18) Aboukir voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Norfolk Island. [These convicts appear to have all landed in Van Diemen's Land], Australia in 1851 with 280 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/aboukir/1851
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 28) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  9. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html


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