Joy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Joy is derived from the personal names Josse or Goce. The name Joy is derived from the Latin word "gaudere" and is cognate in origin with the words joy and joyous. The personal names Josse and Goce were made popular by St. Josse the Hermit, who refused the sovereignty of Brittany. Joyce was used primarily as a female personal name, although some of the earlier instances were masculine. The Gaelic form of the surname Joy is Seoigh.

Early Origins of the Joy family

The surname Joy was first found in Glamorganshire (Welsh: Sir Forgannwg), a region of South Wales, anciently part of the Welsh kingdom of Glywysing.

However, the Welsh origin is very much overshadowed by the Irish predominance of the name in later years. In Ireland, the family was "of Welsh origin which became completely hibernicized; their territory was called Joyce's country. They also became one of the 'Tribes Of Galway' " [1]

Perhaps an exploration of one of the earliest entries for the name will assist. Thomas Jorz or Joyce, also called Thomas the Englishman (d. 1310), was an English "cardinal, is said to have been born of a good family in London, although he was perhaps, as has been sometimes suggested, a Welshman by descent. He was one of six brothers, who all entered the Dominican order. Two of them, Walter and Roland, were successively Archbishops of Armagh [Ireland]. " [2]

Walter Jorz or Jorse (fl. 1306), "Archbishop of Armagh, was a Dominican of Oxford. Like Thomas Jorz [q. v.], his brother, he is doubtfully said to have been a disciple of Albertus Magnus, and a fellow-student with Thomas Aquinas." [2]

Early History of the Joy family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Joy research. Another 102 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1172, 1487, 1647, 1647 and 1647 are included under the topic Early Joy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Joy Spelling Variations

Church officials and medieval scribes often simply spelled names as they sounded. As a result, a single person's name may have been recorded a dozen different ways during his lifetime. Spelling variations for the name Joy include: Joyce, Joyes, Joy, Joice and others.

Early Notables of the Joy family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family up to this time was Cornet George Joyce (fl. 1647), an officer in the Parliamentary New Model Army during the English Civil War. He is said to have been originally a tailor in London. He entered the army of the eastern association, appears to have served in Cromwell's regiment, and was in 1647 a cornet in the horse regiment of Sir Thomas Fairfax. When the quarrel between the army and...
Another 73 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Joy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Joy World Ranking

In the United States, the name Joy is the 2,509th most popular surname with an estimated 12,435 people with that name. [3] However, in Newfoundland, Canada, the name Joy is ranked the 476th most popular surname with an estimated 99 people with that name. [4] And in New Zealand, the name Joy is the 723rd popular surname with an estimated 989 people with that name. [5]


United States Joy migration to the United States +

The Irish emigration during the late 18th and 19th century contributed to the melting pot of nationalities in North America, and the building of a whole new era of industry and commerce in what was seen as a rich, new land. Ireland'sGreat Potato Famine resulted in the worst economic and social conditions in the island's history. And in response to the hunger, disease, and poverty, during this decade the total number of emigrants to leave for North America rivaled all the previous years combined. Those from this decade that arrived on North American shores were not warmly welcomed by the established population, but they were vital to the rapid development of the industry, agriculture, and infrastructure of the infant nations of the United States and what would become Canada. Research into early immigration and passenger lists has shown many people bearing the name Joy:

Joy Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Asher Joy, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [6]
  • Thomas Joy, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1635 [6]
  • William Joy, who arrived in Virginia in 1652 [6]
  • Rich Joy, who arrived in Virginia in 1658 [6]
  • Mary Joy, who arrived in Virginia in 1658 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Joy Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Eliza Joy, who arrived in Virginia in 1702 [6]
Joy Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Eleanor Fitzpatrick Joy, aged 22, who landed in Massachusetts in 1813 [6]
  • John Joy, aged 23, who landed in America in 1822 [6]
  • Michael Joy, who landed in New York in 1826 [6]
  • Peter Joy, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1827 [6]
  • Reuben M Joy, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1849 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Joy migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Joy Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Garrett Joy, aged 25 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Sir Henry Pottinger" departing 29th May 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 7th August 1847 but he died on board [7]

Australia Joy migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Joy Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Joy, English convict who was convicted in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 18th June 1835, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [8]
  • Mr. Richard Joy, English convict who was convicted in Devon, England for life, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 18th June 1835, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [8]
  • Mr. Thomas Joy, British Convict who was convicted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada for 14 years, transported aboard the "Cressy" on 28th April 1843, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [9]
  • Mr. Thomas Joy, English convict who was convicted in Devon, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Equestrian" on 30th June 1845, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Island) [10]
  • Charles Joy, aged 42, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship "Ascendant" [11]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Joy migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Joy Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. J. Boxer Joy, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "William Watson" arriving in New Plymouth, Taranaki, North Island, New Zealand on 30th December 1857 [12]
  • Mrs. Sarah Joy, (b. 1835), aged 34, English settler from Bedfordshire, England who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Caroline Coventry" in 1869 [13]
  • Mr. William Jason Joy, (b. 1869), aged 6 months, English settler from Bedfordshire, England who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Caroline Coventry" in 1869 [13]
  • Abel Joy, (b. 1836), aged 33, English ploughman from Bedfordshire, England who arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Caroline Coventry" in 1869 [13]
  • Mr. James Joy, (b. 1848), aged 25, Cornish labourer departing on 18th June 1873 aboard the ship "St. Leonards" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 26th September 1873 [14]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Joy (post 1700) +

  • Homer Joy (1945-2012), American songwriter, best known for his song Streets of Bakersfield
  • Leatrice Joy (1893-1985), American actress
  • Mike Joy (b. 1949), American TV sports announcer
  • William Nelson Joy (b. 1954), American computer scientist
  • Megan Joy (b. 1985), American singer-songwriter
  • Ian Paul Joy (b. 1981), American soccer player
  • Benjamin Joy, American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from Tompkins County 1st District, 1854 [15]
  • Mrs. Ben Joy, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Arizona, 1960 [15]
  • August Joy, American Republican politician, Candidate for Connecticut State House of Representatives from Newtown, 1932 [15]
  • Angus T. Joy, American Republican politician, Candidate for Connecticut State House of Representatives from Newtown, 1930 [15]
  • ... (Another 27 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Monongah Mine
  • Mr. Antonio Joy (b. 1882), Italian coal miner who was in mine 8 at the Monongah mine on 6th December 1907 when it exploded and collapsed; he died [16]
  • Mr. Frank Joy (b. 1851), Italian coal miner who was in mine 8 at the Monongah mine on 6th December 1907 when it exploded and collapsed; he died [16]
  • Mr. Peter Joy (b. 1875), Italian coal miner who was at the Monongah mine on 6th December 1907 when it exploded and collapsed; he died [16]
SS Newfoundland
  • Mr. Michael Joy (1891-1914), Newfoundlander from Harbour Main, who on the 30th March 1914 he was part of the Seal Crew of the "SS Newfoundland" leaving the ship to intercept the Stephano which took him to the hunting grounds, he disembarked to begin sealing, but was caught in a thickening storm, attempting to return to the Newfoundland he and the 132 crew made camp for two days the sealers were stranded on the ice in a blizzard attempting to return to the ship, he died during this time


The Joy Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Mors aut honorabilis vita
Motto Translation: Death, or life with honour.


Suggested Readings for the name Joy +

  • Ancestry of the Jameson, Gilbert, Joy, Skinner, and Related Families by Bradner Petersen.
  • Thomas Joy and His Descendants by James Richard Joy.

  1. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Irish Families Their Names, Arms and Origins 4th Edition. Dublin: Irish Academic, 1982. Print. (ISBN 0-7165-2364-7)
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  4. ^ The order of Common Surnames in 1955 in Newfoundland retrieved on 20th October 2021 (retrieved from Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland by E.R. Seary corrected edition ISBN 0-7735-1782-0)
  5. ^ https://forebears.io/new-zealand/surnames
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 81)
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 20th August 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/aurora
  9. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 21st May 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/cressy
  10. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 9th May 2022). https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/equestrian
  11. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The ASCENDANT 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Ascendant.htm
  12. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  13. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 5th November 2010). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  14. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Auckland 1872-80 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  15. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 20) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  16. ^ Monongah Mining Disaster retrieved on 8th August 2021. (Retrieved fromhttps://usminedisasters.miningquiz.com/saxsewell/monongah.htm).


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