Jacques History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

Jacques is one of the many new names that came to England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Jacques comes from the personal name Jacques, which is a form of the Latin name Jacobus.

Early Origins of the Jacques family

The surname Jacques was first found in Yorkshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Nether Silton in the North Riding of Yorkshire. At the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086, Nether Silton was recorded as a village with a Hall and the tenant-in-chief was the Count of Mortain. The Domesday Book was a census initiated by Duke William of Normandy taken after his conquest of England at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Important Dates for the Jacques family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jacques research. Another 107 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1440, 1639, 1st , 1628, 1613, 1818, 1653, 1639 and 1640 are included under the topic Early Jacques History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jacques Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Jacques, Jaques, Jack, Jacks, Jackes, Jakes, Jeeks, Jeke, Jeex, Jaquiss, Jaquez and many more.

Early Notables of the Jacques family (pre 1700)

Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jacques Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jacques family to Ireland

Some of the Jacques family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 36 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jacques migration to the United States

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Jacques or a variant listed above:

Jacques Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Henry Jacques, who settled in New England in 1635
  • Edmond Jacques, who arrived in Maryland in 1640 [1]
  • Henry Jacques, who landed in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1669 [1]
  • Thomas Jacques, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1683
  • Jean Jacques, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1696 [1]
Jacques Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Jacques, who settled in New Orleans La. in 1720 with his son
  • Frances Jacques, who settled in Virginia in 1725
  • Abraham Jacques, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1736 [1]
Jacques Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Jacques, who arrived in New York in 1809 [1]
  • John J Jacques, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816 [1]

Jacques migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Jacques Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Louis Jacques, who settled in Quebec in 1688 from Picardy
  • Louis Jacques, who landed in Quebec in 1688
  • Louis Jacques, son of Nicolas and Marie, married Antoinette Le Roux, daughter of François and Marie, in Quebec on 17th May 1688 [2]
Jacques Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Nicolas Jacques, son of Louis and Antoinette, married Marie-Josephte Bédard, daughter of Jacques and Isabelle, in Charlesbourg, Quebec on 17th October 1712 [2]
  • Louis Jacques, son of Louis and Antoinette, married Marie-Marguerite Séguin, daughter of Robert and Claudine, in Charlesbourg, Quebec on 20th November 1719 [2]
  • Pierre Jacques, son of Louis and Antoinette, married Marie-Ambroise Chalifour, daughter of Pierre and Anne, in Charlesbourg, Quebec on 12th February 1720 [2]
  • Nicolas Jacques, son of Louis and Antoinette, married Marie-Josephte Tessier, daughter of Pierre and Marie-Anne, in Charlesbourg, Quebec on 15th July 1737 [2]
  • Henri Jacques, son of Mathieu and Catherine, married Marie-Josephte Garand, daughter of Pierre and Madeleine, in Saint-François-de-la-Rivière-du-Sud, Quebec on 29th October 1738 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Jacques Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Jacques, aged 22 who was a Seaman aboard the ship "Elizabeth" taking passenger to Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec but died at Grosse Isle on 12th June 1847 in the typhus epidemic [3]

Jacques migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Jacques Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Robert Jacques, who arrived in Kangaroo Bay aboard the ship "Tam O'Shanter" in 1836 [4]
  • William Jacques, who arrived in Kangaroo Bay aboard the ship "Tam O'Shanter" in 1836 [4]
  • Charlotte Jacques, aged 40, who arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship "Trafalgar" [5]
  • Mary Jacques, aged 26, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "Medina" [6]
  • Hannah Jacques, aged 24, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Europa" [7]

Jacques migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Jacques Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Jacques, (b. 1849), aged 14, British settler travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship " Lancashire Witch" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 13th October 1863 [8]

Contemporary Notables of the name Jacques (post 1700)

  • Shirley J. Jacques, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1996; Chair of Saline County Democratic Party, 2011 [9]
  • Norman J. Jacques, American politician, Representative from Rhode Island 1st District, 1992 [9]
  • Joseph Jacques (1825-1883), American politician, Mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee, 1858, 1878 [9]
  • Geoffrey Jacques, American politician, Candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1980 [9]
  • Fred W. Jacques, American Republican politician, Member of Connecticut State House of Representatives from Waterford; elected 1926 [9]
  • Francois Jacques, American Republican politician, Candidate for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Manchester 12th Ward, 1938 [9]
  • Emile Jacques, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1964 [9]
  • Cheryl Ann Jacques, American Democrat politician, Member of Massachusetts State Senate, 1993- [9]
  • Arthur Francis Jacques (b. 1874), American Democrat politician, Coal business; Candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1916; Mayor of Marquette, Michigan, 1934-38 [9]
  • Thomas Reginald Jacques (1894-1969), English choral and orchestral conductor
  • ... (Another 9 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Internoscia, Arthur E., and Claire Chevrier. Dictionnaire National des Canadiens Français 1608-1760. Vol. 1, Institut Drouin, 1958.
  3. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 62)
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) TAM O'SHANTER - 1836. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1836TamOShanter.htm
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) TRAFALGAR 1850. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1850Trafalgar-March.htm
  6. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MEDINA 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/medina1852.shtml
  7. ^ South Australian Register Monday 14th May 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Europa 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/europa1855.shtml
  8. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  9. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
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