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Hurdle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Anglo-Saxon name Hurdle comes from when its first bearer worked as a herdsman. The surname Hurdle is derived from the Old English word herde, which in turn comes from the Old English word heird, which means herd.


Early Origins of the Hurdle family


The surname Hurdle was first found in Suffolk where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Early History of the Hurdle family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hurdle research.
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) covering the year 1273 is included under the topic Early Hurdle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hurdle Spelling Variations


Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Hurdle include Herd, Heard, Hird, Hurd and others.

Early Notables of the Hurdle family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Hurdle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hurdle family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Hurdle Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • James Hurdle, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1863
  • Mr. James Hurdle, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Gertrude" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th February 1863 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html

Contemporary Notables of the name Hurdle (post 1700)


  • Joan Hurdle, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Montana, 2000 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 1) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Hurdle Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Recte et sapienter
Motto Translation: Rightly and wisely.


Hurdle Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 1) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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