Hules History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Hules is a name that was carried to England in the great wave of migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Hules family lived in Hulse, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union and hundred of Northwich in Cheshire. [1] [2]

Hulse is derived from the Old English word holh, which means hollow or depression.

Early Origins of the Hules family

The surname Hules was first found in Cheshire where they are conjecturally descended from Bigot de Loges, the holder of these estates at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book. It is assumed that this noble may be assumed to be William Bigot, brother of the famous Roger Bigod, both of whom were at the Conquest in 1066. [3]

The Royal County of Berkshire, home of Windsor Castle was home to an early branch of the family. "In 13th century Bartholomew de la Huse was of the same county (Testa de Neville); and in 1322 Peter de la Huse or Hoese was returned from Berkshire for Knight Service. " [4]

In the 15th century, we found Thomas Hulse, East Cheshire in 1473 and the Register of the University of Oxford included Robert Hulse, Cheshire in 1581. [5]

The Hulse Baronetcy, of Lincoln's Inn Fields in the County of Middlesex is a title created on 7 February 1739 for Edward Hulse, (c. 1682-1759) Physician in Ordinary to Queen Anne, George I and George II. [6] This Baronetcy continues to this day. Their family seat is Breamore House, Breamore, Hampshire.

Early History of the Hules family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hules research. Another 199 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1660, 1600, 1616, 1682, 1759, 1714, 1800, 1744, 1816, 1802, 1708, 1790 and 1708 are included under the topic Early Hules History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hules Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Hules include Huls, Hulse, Hulles, Hulsey and others.

Early Notables of the Hules family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Edward Hulse, 1st Baronet (c. 1682-1759), of Lincoln's Inn Fields, was Physician in Ordinary to Queen Anne, King George I and King George II. Sir Edward Hulse, 2nd Baronet (1714-1800) was an English peer, as was Sir Edward...
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hules Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hules family

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Huless to arrive on North American shores: Charles Hulse who settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1843; G.W. Hulse settled in San Francisco Cal. in 1850; R. Hulse settled in Maryland in 1767..



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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