Herry History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, the name Herry was first found in Britina. It was a name for a person who was the son of the ruler of the property upon which he lived. Initially, le Herisse, the name came to England with the Norman Conquest, and is of Old French derivation. Another derivation, which is probably more common shows that the name is a version of the Old English given name Harry. [1] Although both derivations are valid time has confused them and historians now disagree on which is appropriate in a given situation.

Early Origins of the Herry family

The surname Herry was first found in Normandy, where Hericius and his brothers were in 1022 prohibited by King Robert of France from making inroads of on the estates of a neighbouring abbey. "Henricus was father of Ancelin de Beaumont who in 1086 held a barony in Nottinghamshire. Ivo Fitz-Herice or De Heriz, his son was Viscount of Nottinghamshire before 1130." [2]

His sons quickly spread through Britain as seen by Robert Fitz-Herice who was mentioned in a charter of Barberie Abbey, executed by Henry II; Josceline Fitz-Herice mentioned in Huntingdonshire in 1156; and William who held two fees in Nottinghamshire and four in Lincolnshire in 1165. Humphrey Hairez was listed in Berkshire in 1158.

William Herez held an estate in Wiltshire in the 13th century and later one of his descendants held estates in Salisbury in 1469 and was ancestor of the Earls of Malmsbury who also have three herrisons on their arms. [2]

" Harris and Heris are armorially identified, each bearing three herissons (hedgehogs) in allusion to the name." [2]

"Wootton Hall [in Wooton, Northamptonshire], the seat of W. Harris, Esq., stands elevated, and commands extensive prospects: the grounds are surrounded with thriving plantations." [3]

Early History of the Herry family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Herry research. Another 158 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1080, 1600, 1483, 1399, 1581, 1658, 1588, 1658, 1680, 1596, 1649, 1628, 1644, 1650, 1686, 1671, 1685, 1631, 1677, 1661, 1677, 1666, 1719 and are included under the topic Early Herry History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Herry Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Herry are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Herry include Harris, Harries, Harrys, Harryss, Haries, Haris, Hairis and many more.

Early Notables of the Herry family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John ap Harry of Poston in Vowchurch, High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1399; Robert Harris (1581-1658), an English clergyman, known as a Puritan preacher, member of the Westminster Assembly, and President of Trinity College, Oxford; John Harris (Harrys) (c.1588-1658), an English academic and clergyman, Regius Professor of Greek at Oxford, long-time Warden of Winchester College, and a member of the Westminster Assembly; Peter Harris (the elder) (died 1680), a British buccaneer, one of the captains...
Another 82 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Herry Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Herry family to Ireland

Some of the Herry family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Herry migration to the United States +

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Herry, or a variant listed above:

Herry Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Lawrence Herry, who arrived in Virginia in 1642 [4]
  • Teague Herry, aged 25, who landed in New York in 1649 [4]
  • Tyck Herry, aged 25, who arrived in New York in 1649 [4]


The Herry Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ubique patriam reminisci
Motto Translation: Everywhere to remember one's country.


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate