Hepdant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Hepdant surname is thought to be derived from one of several place names in West Yorkshire. The place names come from the Old English "heope," or "(rose) hip," and "denu," which meant "valley." [1]

Early Origins of the Hepdant family

The surname Hepdant was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Hebden, a township, in the parish of Linton, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross. [2] [3] This township dates back to the Domesday Book where it was recorded as Hebedene. [4]

In the same West Riding, the village of Hebden Bridge which "derives its name from the river Hebden, which divides the village into two portions, communicating with each other by two neat bridges." [2] The first record for this village was in 1399 when it was recorded as Hepdenbryge. [1]

In 1120 the manor of Hebden was granted by Roger de Mowbray to Uctred de Hebden, who was a descendant of Uctred, Earl of Northumberland. The Curia Regis Rolls of 1208 lists Elias de Heppedon in 1208 and later the Feet of Fines for Yorkshire lists William de Hebbeden in 1312. [5]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 include Dionisius de Hebdeyn, and Adam de Hebden, Salter, was listed as a Freemen of York, 1 Edward III (during the first year of the reign of Edward III. [6]

"The Hebdens, who derive their name from more than one West Riding village, are probably for the most part descended from an ancient gentle family of Ripon during the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, where they frequently filled the office of wakeman and afterwards of mayor. William de Hebden was rector of Burnsall in the reign of Edward III. Baker Hebdon was warden of Hull in 1761 (Tickell's "Hull"). The Hebdens are now numerous in the district of Bedale, and they are still represented in Ripon." [7]

Further to the north in Scotland, "a family of this name possessed the island of Eday, Orkney, in the nineteenth century. [The family was] probably from one or other of the villages of the name in the West Riding of Yorkshire. William de Hebden was rector of Burnsall, Yorkshire, in the reign of Edward III." [8]

Early History of the Hepdant family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hepdant research. Another 148 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1220, 1612, 1670, 1738, 1755, 1763 and 1811 are included under the topic Early Hepdant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hepdant Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore,spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Hepdant has been recorded under many different variations, including Hebden, Hebdon, Heberden, Hepden, Habton, Habdon, Hibdon, Hibden, Ebdon and many more.

Early Notables of the Hepdant family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Hebden, Rector of Burnsall, Sir John Hebden, a Russian merchant agent for Tsar Alexis embassy to Russia for Charles II; and his son, Sir John Hebdon (1612-1670.) His father is buried at Lower Tooting in Surrey. [2] Thomas Ebdon was born at Durham in 1738. It is presumed from the circumstance of the name and date 'T. Ebdon, 1755,' still remaining, carved...
Another 68 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hepdant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hepdant family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Hepdant or a variant listed above: John Ebden who settled in Barbados in 1670; Thomas Ebdon settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1716; Thomas Hebden settled in Virginia in 1634; John Hebden settled in Virginia in 1651..



The Hepdant Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Re e merito
Motto Translation: This through merit.


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  8. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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