Hayth History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Hayth comes from when the family resided on a heath, which is an area of level, uncultivated land with poor, coarse, undrained soil and rich deposits of peat or peaty humus. The surname Hayth belongs to the class of topographic surnames, which were given to people who resided near physical features such as hills, streams, churches, or types of trees.

Early Origins of the Hayth family

The surname Hayth was first found in Durham where it was first listed as Atte-Hethe, Apud Hethe and Del la Hethe in the Rotuli Hundredorum of 1279. [1] The name was denoted for someone who lived on or by a heath, typically filled with heather. [2] Kirby's Quest for Somerset listed Adam atte Hethe and John atte Hethe during the reign of Edward III. [3]

Later in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379, Robert del Heth was listed. Thomas Atte-Hethe was rector of Ringstead Parva, Norfolk in 1376 and Ralph atte Heythe was rector of Rockland Tofts, Norfolk in 1398. [4]

Robert Heete or Robert of Woodstock (d. 1428), was an early "canonist and civilian, presumably a native of Woodstock, Oxfordshire, became scholar of Winchester College in 1401, and in due course scholar of New College, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. and LL.B. " [5]

Early History of the Hayth family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hayth research. Another 105 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1577, 1585, 1575, 1649, 1575, 1629, 1664, 1629, 1583, 1567, 1615, 1600, 1599, 1643, 1599, 1501, 1578, 1501, 1629, 1664, 1661, 1704, 1766, 1704, 1672 and 1728 are included under the topic Early Hayth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hayth Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Hayth has been recorded under many different variations, including Heath, Hethe and others.

Early Notables of the Hayth family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Sir Robert Heath (1575-1649), Attorney General of England, and founder of North Carolina and South Carolina. He was the son of Robert Heath of Brasted, Kent, a member of the Inner Temple and was born at Brasted on 20 May 1575. [5] James Heath (1629-1664), was a historian, son of Robert Heath, the king's cutler, who lived in the Strand, was born in London in 1629, and educated in Westminster School. [5] Thomas Heath ( fl. 1583), was an English mathematician, born in London and was admitted probationer fellow of All Souls, Oxford, in 1567. [5] John...
Another 129 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hayth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hayth family to Ireland

Some of the Hayth family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hayth family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Hayth or a variant listed above: William Heath settled in New England in 1620; later moving to Boston in 1632; Amory, Henry, Isaac, Jane, John, Margaret, Mary, Nicholas, Thomas and William Heath, all settled in Virginia between 1640 and 1680.



The Hayth Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Espere mieux
Motto Translation: Hope for better.


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  3. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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