Hargreave History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient roots of the Hargreave family name are in the Anglo-Saxon culture. The name Hargreave comes from when the family lived in Hargrave, a place-name found in the counties of Cheshire, Northamptonshire, and Suffolk. There is also a Hargrave Hall in Cheshire. The place-name is derived from the Old English elements har, which meant "hare" or "on the border," and graf or græfe, which meant "grove." The place-name as a whole meant "grove filled with rabbits" or "grove on a border." [1]

Alternatively, the name could have been derived from a Saxon occupation, as "the provider or commissary of an army, from Here or Har, an army, and grave, a steward or disposer." [2]

"Hargreaves is an old Lancashire name. It is also common in the West Riding, particularly in the Leeds district. There are two Cheshire hamlets called Hargrave." [3]

Early Origins of the Hargreave family

The surname Hargreave was first found in Cheshire at Hargrave, which dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it was listed as Haregrave. The Domesday Book also lists Haragrauna in Suffolk and Haregrave in Northamptonshire. [4]

The first record of the family was Geoffrey de Haregrave who was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Derbyshire in 1188. [5] A few years later, in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273, John de Haregrave was listed as holding lands in Buckinghamshire at that time.

Later again, in East Cheshire in 1296, two records were found: William de Haregreve; and Richard de Haregreve. "The Hargreaves of Lancashire probably spring from Hargrave, Cheshire." [6]

The Subsidy Rolls of Lancashire listed Henry de Hargreve in 1332. [5] This latter source notes that Hargreave Hall was located in Cheshire, but we can find no record of it today.

Early History of the Hargreave family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hargreave research. Another 91 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1286, 1332, 1486, 1499, 1541, 1529, 1690, 1741 and 1739 are included under the topic Early Hargreave History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hargreave Spelling Variations

One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Hargreave has appeared include Hargrove, Hargreave, Hargreaves, Hargrave, Hargroves and many more.

Early Notables of the Hargreave family (pre 1700)

Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hargreave Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Hargreave migration to the United States +

At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Hargreave arrived in North America very early:

Hargreave Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Elisha Hargreave, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1852

Australia Hargreave migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Hargreave Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Henry Bottomley Hargreave, English convict who was convicted in Leeds, Yorkshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Earl Grey" on 4th October 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [7]

New Zealand Hargreave migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Hargreave Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • David Crispin Hargreave, aged 25, a compositor, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Clifton" in 1842
  • Sarah Hargreave, aged 25, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Clifton" in 1842
  • John William Hargreave, aged 11 months, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Clifton" in 1842

Contemporary Notables of the name Hargreave (post 1700) +

  • Charles James Hargreave (1820-1866), English judge of landed estate court and mathematician, eldest son of James Hargreave, woollen manufacturer, born at Wortley, near Leeds, Yorkshire, in December 1820 [8]


The Hargreave Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vincit amor patria
Motto Translation: My beloved country will conquer.


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 16th August 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/earl-gray
  8. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 30 June 2020


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