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Hampden History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Early Origins of the Hampden family


The surname Hampden was first found in Buckinghamshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having prevailed over King Harold, granted most of Britain to his many victorious Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a Bishop, with 60 or more Lordships scattered throughout the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to distinguish him from the senior stem of the family. After many rebellious wars between his Barons, Duke William, commissioned a census of all England to determine in 1086, settling once and for all, who held which land. He called the census the Domesday Book, [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
indicating that those holders registered would hold the land until the end of time. Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Hampden, held by William FitzAnsculf of Picquigni in Picardy near Amiens who held a Castle there dating back tot the 8th century and who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086.

Early History of the Hampden family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hampden research.
Another 273 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1102, 1595, 1643, 1653, 1696, 1679, 1681, 1681, 1685, 1689, 1690, 1631, 1695, 1776, 1696, 1754, 1653 and 1696 are included under the topic Early Hampden History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hampden Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Hampden has been recorded under many different variations, including Hampden, Hamden and others.

Early Notables of the Hampden family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Hampden (c.1595-1643), English politician and Roundhead in the English Civil War; John Hampden (1653-1696), English politician, Member for Buckinghamshire (1679-1681), Wendover (1681-1685) and (1689-1690), pamphleteer, and opponent of Charles II and James II, convicted of treason after the Monmouth Rebellion; and Richard...
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hampden Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hampden family to Ireland


Some of the Hampden family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hampden family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Hampdens were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: the name represented in many forms and recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands..

Contemporary Notables of the name Hampden (post 1700)


  • Peter Hampden, American film producer, known for The Nice Guys (2016)
  • Walter Hampden (1879-1955), stage name of Walter Hampden Dougherty, one of the great American stage actors and theatre manager
  • Renn Dickson Hampden (1793-1868), English theologian and Professor at Oxford
  • John Hampden -Trevor PC (b. 1748), 3rd Viscount Hampden, a British diplomat, Minister to Bavaria (1780–1783), British Minister to Sardinia (1783–1798)
  • Robert Hampden -Trevor (b. 1706), 1st Viscount Hampden, a British diplomat, British Ambassador to the United Provinces (1739–1746), Postmaster General of the United Kingdom (1759–1765)
  • Sir John Hampden Inskip (1879-1960), British peer and politician, Lord Mayor of Bristol in 1931
  • John Hampden Pleasants (1797-1846), American journalist and businessman who died as a result of a duel with Thomas Ritchie, editor of a rival newspaper, the Richmond Enquirer
  • James Hampden Robb (1846-1911), American politician, New York State Assembly in 1882 and New York State Senator (1884-1885)
  • J. Hampden Robb, American Democrat politician, Member of New York State Assembly from New York County 11th District, 1882; Member of New York State Senate 10th District, 1884-85 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Walter Hampden Overton (1788-1845), American Democrat politician, U.S. Representative from Louisiana 3rd District, 1829-31 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Hampden Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vestigia nulla retrorsum
Motto Translation: No steps backwards.


Hampden Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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