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Hamden History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Early Origins of the Hamden family


The surname Hamden was first found in Buckinghamshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having prevailed over King Harold, granted most of Britain to his many victorious Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a Bishop, with 60 or more Lordships scattered throughout the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to distinguish him from the senior stem of the family. After many rebellious wars between his Barons, Duke William, commissioned a census of all England to determine in 1086, settling once and for all, who held which land. He called the census the Domesday Book, [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
indicating that those holders registered would hold the land until the end of time. Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Hampden, held by William FitzAnsculf of Picquigni in Picardy near Amiens who held a Castle there dating back tot the 8th century and who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086.

Early History of the Hamden family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hamden research.
Another 273 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1102, 1595, 1643, 1653, 1696, 1679, 1681, 1681, 1685, 1689, 1690, 1631, 1695, 1776, 1696, 1754, 1653 and 1696 are included under the topic Early Hamden History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hamden Spelling Variations


Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Hampden, Hamden and others.

Early Notables of the Hamden family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Hampden (c.1595-1643), English politician and Roundhead in the English Civil War; John Hampden (1653-1696), English politician, Member for Buckinghamshire (1679-1681), Wendover (1681-1685) and (1689-1690), pamphleteer, and opponent of Charles II and James II, convicted of treason after the Monmouth Rebellion; and Richard...
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hamden Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hamden family to Ireland


Some of the Hamden family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hamden family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Hamden Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • William Hamden, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Stebonheath" in 1849 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) STEBONHEATH 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Stebonheath.htm

Contemporary Notables of the name Hamden (post 1700)


  • Major-General George Hamden Olmsted (1901-1998), American Assistant Commanding General 103rd Division (1946-1947) [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) George Olmsted. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Olmsted/George_Hamden/USA.html
  • Hamden Landon Forkner Sr. (1897-1975), American educator and writer who founded Future Business Leaders of America and developed the Forkner shorthand system for taking dictation

The Hamden Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vestigia nulla retrorsum
Motto Translation: No steps backwards.


Hamden Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) STEBONHEATH 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Stebonheath.htm
  3. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2014, March 26) George Olmsted. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Olmsted/George_Hamden/USA.html

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