Hagger History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient Pictish-Scottish name Hagger comes from the Gaelic form Mac-an-t-sagairt, which means son of the priest. Patronymic names often substituted the name of a saint or other revered religious figure in place of a devout bearer's actual father. However, the patronym Hagger often denotes actual paternity in this case, since the marriage of clerics in minor orders was permissible, although the marriage of priests was declared illegal and invalid during the 12th century.

The etymology of the name is much in debate. One source notes the "family are supposed to be derived from the Ogards of co. Hertfordshire." or the name "Haggard is a corruption of "hay-garth," a rick yard, and is so employed in Hall and Holinshed, as well as in several provincial dialects, but most probably, an ancient baptismal name which occurs in Domesday as Acard and Acardus." [1]

Early Origins of the Hagger family

The surname Hagger was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The Scottish branch of the family was recorded quite late as "the name occurs in Suffolk in thirteenth century as Hacgard." [2] [3]

One of the first records of the family was found in Worcestershire, England where Alice Haggard was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of 1275. [4] In this case, the name may have been derived from the Middle English and Old French word hagard which means 'wild, untamed.'

Early History of the Hagger family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hagger research. Another 78 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 172 and 1723 are included under the topic Early Hagger History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hagger Spelling Variations

Scribes in the Middle Ages did not have access to a set of spelling rules. They spelled according to sound, the result was a great number of spelling variations. In various documents, Hagger has been spelled Haggard, Hagard, Hagger, Hagart, Haggart, Hager and many more.

Early Notables of the Hagger family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Hagger Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Hagger migration to the United States +

The cruelties suffered under the new government forced many to leave their ancient homeland for the freedom of the North American colonies. Those who arrived safely found land, freedom, and opportunity for the taking. These hardy settlers gave their strength and perseverance to the young nations that would become the United States and Canada. Immigration and passenger lists have shown many early immigrants bearing the name Hagger:

Hagger Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Frieda Hagger, aged 21, who landed in America, in 1894
  • Johanna Hagger, aged 38, who landed in America from Sweden, in 1894
Hagger Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Laura Hagger, aged 34, who settled in America from London, in 1903
  • George Hagger, aged 55, who immigrated to America from London, in 1905
  • Henry Hagger, aged 34, who immigrated to the United States from London, England, in 1908
  • Thomas Hagger, aged 35, who immigrated to the United States from Paddington, Australia, in 1909
  • Grace Hagger, aged 35, who landed in America from Brighton, England, in 1909
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Hagger migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Hagger Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • Leonard Percival Hagger, aged 27, who immigrated to Cargill, Ont, Canada, in 1920
  • Winifred Dora Hagger, aged 30, who immigrated to Cargill, Ont, Canada, in 1920

Australia Hagger migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Hagger Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Hagger, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Mitchell" in 1840 [5]
  • James Hagger, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Branken Moor" in 1849 [6]
  • James Hagger, aged 22, a bricklayer, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship "Brankenmoor" [6]
  • Frances Hagger, aged 18, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship "Sultana" [7]
  • George Hagger, aged 27, a bricklayer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Caroline" [8]

Contemporary Notables of the name Hagger (post 1700) +

  • Lloyd Hagger (1898-1968), Australian rules footballer who played with Geelong Football Club (1917-1929), Captain of Geelong in 1924, and coached the same team in 1924
  • Kimberly "Kim" Hagger (1961-1986), English bronze medalist long jumper at the 1986 Commonwealth Games


The Hagger Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Modeste conabor
Motto Translation: I will attempt moderately.


Suggested Readings for the name Hagger +

  • 2627 From Ireland, Land of Pain and Sorrow: A Historical Chronicle of Two Cultures by Joseph L. Grady.

  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) WILLIAM MITCHELL 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840WilliamMitchell.gif
  6. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The BRANKEN MOOR 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849BrankenMoor.htm
  7. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) SULTANA 1850. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1850Sultana.htm
  8. ^ South Australian Register Thursday 26th April 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Caroline 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/caroline1855.shtml


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