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Gueilfeard History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Gueilfeard is a name whose history is connected to the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the Gueilfeard family once lived in the village of Guildford, which was in the county of Surrey. The surname was originally derived from the Old English word guilford which denoted the "ford where the marigolds grew."

Early Origins of the Gueilfeard family


The surname Gueilfeard was first found in Kent at Guildford, a county town that dates back to Saxon times c. 880 when it was first listed as Gyldeforda. About 978 or so, it was home to an early English Royal Mint. By the Domesday Book of 1086, [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
the town's name have evolved to Gildeford and was held by William the Conqueror. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Guildford Castle is thought to have been built shortly after the 1066 invasion of England by William the Conqueror. As the castle is not listed in the Domesday Book, it is generally thought to have been built after 1086. Over the years, the castle has gone through many hands and is today held by the Guildford Corporation. It's essentially in ruins, but the gardens are a very popular tourist site. The keep now contains a visitor centre, open between April and September.

Early History of the Gueilfeard family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gueilfeard research.
Another 153 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1500, 1455 and 1506 are included under the topic Early Gueilfeard History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gueilfeard Spelling Variations


Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Gueilfeard family name include Guildford, Guildeford, Guilford, Gilford and others.

Early Notables of the Gueilfeard family (pre 1700)


Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gueilfeard Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gueilfeard family to the New World and Oceana


For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, Canada, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Gueilfeard surname or a spelling variation of the name include: Samuel Guilford settled in Philadelphia in 1851; Margaret Guildford settled in New England in 1769.

The Gueilfeard Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Animo et fide
Motto Translation: By courage and faith.


Gueilfeard Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

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