Gipsoomb History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Gipsoomb family comes from the ancient Scottish Dalriadan clans of the mountainous west coast of Scotland. The name Gipsoomb is derived from the given name Gibb, which is a diminutive form of the name Gilbert. [1]

Early Origins of the Gipsoomb family

The surname Gipsoomb was first found in Galloway (Gaelic: Gall-ghaidhealaibh), an area of southwestern Scotland, now part of the Council Area of Dumfries and Galloway, that formerly consisted of the counties of Wigtown (West Galloway) and Kirkcudbright (East Galloway), where they held a family seat from very early times.

Descended from a chieftain, Gilbert, probably Gilbert, Lord of Galloway, the Gibsons settled first at Lennox in Scotland, and in those early times was a formidable force to be encountered. The first official mention was when John Gibson surrendered the Castle of Rothesay in 1335. A few years later, Thomas Gibbeson was charged with breaking parole in 1358; and John Gybbessone was listed as a servitor of William Douglas when he was held hostage by Henry Vi in 1425.[1]

Later a branch of the family were well established in the sea-port and ancient burgh of barony of Levin in Fifeshire. "This place, which is agreeably situated on the sea-shore at the mouth of the river whence it takes its name, was erected into a burgh of barony by charter of the proprietor of the lands of Durie, now belonging to the Christies, but once in the possession of the family of Gibson, whose descendants, the lords Durie, are distinguished in Scottish history." [2]

Important Dates for the Gipsoomb family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gipsoomb research. Another 153 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1603, 1600, 1615, 1690, 1637, 1717, 1696, 1698, 1702 and are included under the topic Early Gipsoomb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gipsoomb Spelling Variations

Translation in medieval times was an undeveloped science and was often carried out without due care. For this reason, many early Scottish names appeared radically altered when written in English. The spelling variations of Gipsoomb include Gibson, Gibsone, Gibsons, Gipson, Gibsoun, Gipsone, Gibbson, Gibbsone, Gippson and many more.

Early Notables of the Gipsoomb family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan from early times was Richard Gibson (1615-1690), known as "Dwarf Gibson", a painter of portrait miniatures and a court dwarf in England during the reigns of Charles I, Oliver Cromwell, Charles II...
Another 36 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gipsoomb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gipsoomb family to Ireland

Some of the Gipsoomb family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gipsoomb family

The hardy Scots who made the crossing settled all along the east coast of North America and in the great west that was just then opening up. At the time of the American War of Independence, many United Empire Loyalists moved north from the American colonies to Canada. Scottish national heritage became better known in North America in the 20th century through highland games and other patriotic events. An examination of immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Gipsoomb arrived in North America very early: Ann Gibson who settled in New England in 1635; Edward Gibson settled in Virginia in 1637; they also settled in Pennsylvania, New York, and Maryland in the 19th century. George Gibson settled in Fort Cumberland, Nova Scotia in 1774. In Newfoundland, Thomas Gibson settled in Tilton Harbour in 1823.

Citations

  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
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