Gampil History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Gampil is a name that was brought to England by the ancestors of the Gampil family when they emigrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Gampil comes from the given name Gamel, which was common among the Danes and the Normans. The name Gampil was ultimately derived from the Old Norman word Gamall, which means old.

Another source notes: "this surname is derived from the name of an ancestor. 'the son of Gamel,' a once popular but now forgotten North-English personal name. It is compounded with many local names. The modern accepted surname form is Gamble and Gambles." [1]

Early Origins of the Gampil family

The surname Gampil was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where Gamel is listed. [2] Later in Yorkshire, Gamel Auceps was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1158 and later again, Simon Gamel was found in the Assize Rolls for Lincolnshire in 1202. Back in Yorkshire, Adam Gamel was listed in the Assize Rolls of 1260. Jordan Gambel was also listed in 1297. [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 mentions Huttred filius Gamelli in Northumberland and Alan filius Gamel in Shropshire. Much later, the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 include: Elena Gamyll; Henricus Gamyll; Johannes Gamyll; and Johannes Gamolson as all holding lands there at that time. [1]

"Fitz Gamell is also found. From the Anglo-Saxon gamol or gamel, old, aged. It is compounded with some Domesday names, as Gamel-bar, ' old bear' - Gamel-carle, 'old male,' - both in Yorkshire." [4]

Early History of the Gampil family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gampil research. Another 61 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1158, 1297, 1450, 1687, 1666, 1865, 1618, 1629, 1640, 1659, 1663, 1670 and are included under the topic Early Gampil History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Gampil Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Gampil were recorded, including Gamble, Gambel, Gambol and others.

Early Notables of the Gampil family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Gamble (died 1687), composer and musician in the court of King Charles I of England and King Charles II of...
Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gampil Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Gampil family to Ireland

Some of the Gampil family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 243 words (17 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Gampil family

The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Gampil arrived in North America very early: Gideon Gamble who settled in Delaware in 1681; Grisel Gamble settled in East New Jersey in 1686; James Gamble settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1767.



  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.


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