Galliers History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Soon after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, the name Galliers was recognized on the island as a name for a happy, joyous, and bold person. The name Galliers derives from the nickname the galliard, which means the bold or the joyous.

Early Origins of the Galliers family

The surname Galliers was first found in county Devon where they held a family seat from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Important Dates for the Galliers family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Galliers research. Another 66 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 135 and 1351 are included under the topic Early Galliers History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Galliers Spelling Variations

Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Gaylord, Gaillard, Galliard, Gaylor, Gayleard and others.

Early Notables of the Galliers family (pre 1700)

Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Galliers Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Galliers migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Galliers Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Galliers, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Phoebe" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 18th April 1843 [1]

Historic Events for the Galliers family

HMS Cornwall
  • Denis Galliers (d. 1942), British Leading Stoker aboard the HMS Cornwall when she was struck by air bombers and sunk; he died in the sinking [2]

Citations

  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  2. ^ Force Z Survivors Crew List HMS Cornwall (Retrieved 2018, February 13th) - Retrieved from https://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listcornwallcrew.html#A
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate