Fitzrandolf History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Fitzrandolf family

The surname Fitzrandolf was first found in Yorkshire where one of the first records of the name was found at Middleham. "About the year 1190, a splendid castle was built here by Robert Fitz-Ranulph, in which, according to Stowe, Falconbridge, a partisan of Henry VI., was beheaded in 1471; though Speed says he was executed at Southampton. " [1]

Randulf (died 1129), also named Le Meschin, Earl of Chester was the son and heir of Randulf, called 'de Brichessart' (from Briquessart, his family seat), hereditary vicomte of the Bessin in Normandy. However, his position and name was historically in dispute. "According to Dugdale, he came over with the Conqueror, and received the city of Carlisle, of which he became earl. Freeman asserted that he became earl of Cumberland; but, as Mr. Eyton rightly points out, Randulf was never 'earl,' but merely 'lord' of the district." [2]

His son, Randulf, called De Gernons, Earl of Chester (d. 1153) succeeded his lands shortly before 1130. The Pipe Rolls of 1130 list he was indebted to the crown for large sums, including £1,000. which his father had died owing for the fief of his kinsman the Earl of Chester. [2]

Richard FitzRalph, "in Latin Ricardus films Radulphi, often referred to simply as 'Armachanus' or 'Ardmachanus' (d. 1360), was Archbishop of Armagh and born probably in the last years of the thirteenth century at Dundalk in the county of Louth. " [2]

Early History of the Fitzrandolf family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fitzrandolf research. Another 63 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1566, 1523, 1590, 1523, 1590, 1558, 1605, 1635, 1632, 1703, 1684, 1650, 1711, 1698, 1681, 1741, 1683, 1729, 1684, 1742, 1691, 1749, 1727 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Fitzrandolf History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fitzrandolf Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Fitzrandolf are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Fitzrandolf include FitzRandolph, FitzRandolf, FetzRandolff, FitzRandulf, Randolph, FitzRaulf and many more.

Early Notables of the Fitzrandolf family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Edward Randolph (died 1566), English soldier, probably a brother of Thomas Randolph (1523-1590), born at Badlesmere in Kent. "He made himself sufficiently prominent in Edward VI's time to find it necessary to flee to Paris on the accession of Mary. But, like other rebels, he soon tired of exile, and his known value as a soldier rendered the negotiations for his pardon easy." [2] Thomas Randolph (1523-1590) was an English ambassador, son of Avery Randolph of Badlesmere, Kent. In 1558, Randolph was acting as an agent of the English government in Germany. Thomas Randolph (1605-1635)...
Another 186 words (13 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fitzrandolf Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Fitzrandolf family to Ireland

Some of the Fitzrandolf family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 62 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Fitzrandolf family

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Fitzrandolf, or a variant listed above: John Randolph settled in New York in 1822; along with Michael; John and Thomas Randolph settled in San Francisco in 1850.



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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