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The current generations of the Eperkerdoh family have inherited a surname that was first used hundreds of years ago by descendants of the ancient Scottish tribe called the Picts. The Eperkerdoh family lived in the old barony of Aberkirder, in Banffshire.

Early Origins of the Eperkerdoh family


The surname Eperkerdoh was first found in Banffshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Bhanbh), former Scottish county located in the northeasterly Grampian region of Scotland, now of divided between the Council Areas of Moray and Aberdeenshire, in the old barony of Aberkirder, where one of the first of the Clan on record was John Aberkirder who rendered homage to King Edward 1st of England, in 1296. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
Aberchirder is a village, in the parish of Marnoch, "derived from Sir David Aberkerder, Thane of Aberkerder, who lived about the year 1400, and possessed great property here." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Early History of the Eperkerdoh family

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Early History of the Eperkerdoh family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Eperkerdoh research.
Another 107 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 146 and 1468 are included under the topic Early Eperkerdoh History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Eperkerdoh Spelling Variations

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Eperkerdoh Spelling Variations


Scribes in the Middle Ages did not have access to a set of spelling rules. They spelled according to sound, the result was a great number of spelling variations. In various documents, Eperkerdoh has been spelled Aberkirder, Aberkerdour, Aberchirdour and others.

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Early Notables of the Eperkerdoh family (pre 1700)

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Early Notables of the Eperkerdoh family (pre 1700)


Another 22 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Eperkerdoh Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Eperkerdoh family to Ireland

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Migration of the Eperkerdoh family to Ireland


Some of the Eperkerdoh family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 77 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Eperkerdoh family to the New World and Oceana

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Migration of the Eperkerdoh family to the New World and Oceana


The cruelties suffered under the new government forced many to leave their ancient homeland for the freedom of the North American colonies. Those who arrived safely found land, freedom, and opportunity for the taking. These hardy settlers gave their strength and perseverance to the young nations that would become the United States and Canada. Immigration and passenger lists have shown many early immigrants bearing the name Eperkerdoh: James Aberkirder who settled in Virginia in 1690.

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The Eperkerdoh Motto

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The Eperkerdoh Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro rege et patria
Motto Translation: For King and country.


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Eperkerdoh Family Crest Products

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Eperkerdoh Family Crest Products



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See Also

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See Also



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Citations

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Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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