Show ContentsEdday History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Edday is a name of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the son of Ede, as Edison, which was later shortened to Eadie. The surname Edday originally derived from the Old English word Eade which referred to abundant riches.However, another reference claims that the name was derived from the Middle English name Edwy and the Old English word Eadwig which are composed of the elements ead meaning prosperity and wig which meant war. [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Edday family

The surname Edday was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where the name is found as a surname only: Eddiva, Aediva pulchra. [3] Later Stephen Edy was recorded in the Gloucestershire in 1278. [4]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 reveled more early spelling of the name: Edde (no personal name listed) in Norfolk; Edde filius Hugh in Huntingdonshire; William filius Ede in Suffolk; Robert filius Ede in Huntingdonshire; and William Ede in Norfolk. [5]

"Eade is an ancient Suffolk name. In the form of Ede it occurred in this county, as well as in Norfolk, in the reign of Edward I., and in this form it was, at the same time, numerous in the neighbouring county of Huntingdonshire. Under "Sussex" reference will be found to this name in that county. Eades is a name now found in Bedfordshire, whilst Ede is found in Cornwall. The ancient name of Eade has long been in Sussex. In 1203 John Eade bought half a messuage for twenty shillings in the parish of Steyning." [6]

Early History of the Edday family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Edday research. Another 150 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1379, 1500, 1555, 1565, 1566, 1603, 1604, 1609, 1667, 1686 and 1803 are included under the topic Early Edday History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Edday Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Edday have been found, including Eadie, Eades, Edey, Eadey, Eddy, Edeson, Edison and others.

Early Notables of the Edday family

Distinguished members of the family include Richard Eedes or Edes (1555-1604), Dean of Worcester, born probably in Bedfordshire in 1555 of an old family which had been long seated at Sewell in...
Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Edday Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Edday family to Ireland

Some of the Edday family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 36 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Edday family

Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Edday, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were : John Eddy who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, in the year 1630. Samuel Eddy landed in Plymouth in the same year. In 1766; Mary Eddy had made Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina her home.



  1. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  2. Dixon, Bernard Homer, Surnames. London: John Wilson and son, 1857. Print
  3. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.


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