Ebdon History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Ebdon surname is thought to be derived from one of several place names in West Yorkshire. The place names come from the Old English "heope," or "(rose) hip," and "denu," which meant "valley." [1]

Early Origins of the Ebdon family

The surname Ebdon was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Hebden, a township, in the parish of Linton, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross. [2] [3] This township dates back to the Domesday Book where it was recorded as Hebedene. [4]

In the same West Riding, the village of Hebden Bridge which "derives its name from the river Hebden, which divides the village into two portions, communicating with each other by two neat bridges." [2] The first record for this village was in 1399 when it was recorded as Hepdenbryge. [1]

In 1120 the manor of Hebden was granted by Roger de Mowbray to Uctred de Hebden, who was a descendant of Uctred, Earl of Northumberland. The Curia Regis Rolls of 1208 lists Elias de Heppedon in 1208 and later the Feet of Fines for Yorkshire lists William de Hebbeden in 1312. [5]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 include Dionisius de Hebdeyn, and Adam de Hebden, Salter, was listed as a Freemen of York, 1 Edward III (during the first year of the reign of Edward III. [6]

"The Hebdens, who derive their name from more than one West Riding village, are probably for the most part descended from an ancient gentle family of Ripon during the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, where they frequently filled the office of wakeman and afterwards of mayor. William de Hebden was rector of Burnsall in the reign of Edward III. Baker Hebdon was warden of Hull in 1761 (Tickell's "Hull"). The Hebdens are now numerous in the district of Bedale, and they are still represented in Ripon." [7]

Further to the north in Scotland, "a family of this name possessed the island of Eday, Orkney, in the nineteenth century. [The family was] probably from one or other of the villages of the name in the West Riding of Yorkshire. William de Hebden was rector of Burnsall, Yorkshire, in the reign of Edward III." [8]

Early History of the Ebdon family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ebdon research. Another 148 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1220, 1612, 1670, 1738, 1755, 1763 and 1811 are included under the topic Early Ebdon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ebdon Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Ebdon are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. The variations of the name Ebdon include: Hebden, Hebdon, Heberden, Hepden, Habton, Habdon, Hibdon, Hibden, Ebdon and many more.

Early Notables of the Ebdon family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Hebden, Rector of Burnsall, Sir John Hebden, a Russian merchant agent for Tsar Alexis embassy to Russia for Charles II; and his son, Sir John Hebdon (1612-1670.) His father is buried at Lower Tooting in Surrey. [2] Thomas Ebdon was born at Durham in 1738. It is presumed from the circumstance of the name and date 'T. Ebdon, 1755,' still remaining, carved...
Another 68 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ebdon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Ebdon migration to the United States +

Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Ebdon or a variant listed above:

Ebdon Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Ebdon, who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1716

New Zealand Ebdon migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Ebdon Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • George Ebdon, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Simon Ebdon, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • William Ebdon, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Tyne

Contemporary Notables of the name Ebdon (post 1700) +

  • Peter "Ebbo" Ebdon (b. 1970), English professional snooker player
  • Richard George Ebdon (1913-1987), English professional football inside-forward
  • John Francis Ebdon (1876-1952), English cricketer
  • Edward William Ebdon (1870-1950), English cricketer
  • Thomas Ebdon (1738-1811), British composer and organist born in Durham; his name and the date 1755 are found carved on an oak screen in the cathedral, and it is inferred from this that he was a chorister there [9]
  • Sir Leslie Colin Ebdon C.B.E., D.L., (b. 1947), born in Edmonton, London, British former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bedfordshire and Director of Fair Access to Higher Education, was appointed a Knight Bachelor on 8th June 2018 and Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2009 New Years Honours, for services to Higher Education and to Social Mobility [10]
  • John Ebdon, British author, broadcaster, Graecophile and director of the London Planetarium
  • Marcus Ebdon (b. 1970), professional Welsh footballer


The Ebdon Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Re e merito
Motto Translation: This through merit.


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  8. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  9. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 30 June 2020
  10. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62310, 4 July 2019 | London Gazette, The Gazette, June 2018, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/62310/supplement/B1


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