Ebbitt History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Ebbitt is Anglo-Saxon in origin. It was a name given to a superior of a monastery, an Abbot. The name Ebbitt may also be a nickname applied to someone who played the part of an abbot in a medieval pageant, or to a person thought to be particularly pious and devout. [1]

Early Origins of the Ebbitt family

The surname Ebbitt was first found in the counties of Oxfordshire, Huntingdon, Bedfordshire and Cambridge from very ancient times. The family was in this area before the Norman Conquest of England by William, Duke of Normandy in 1066 AD.

Alfwoldus Abbas (1111-1117,) is one such example of a man who was a holder of the monasterial office of Abbot. It is also assumed that the name may have been a source of several more surnames at a later date.

Walter Abat was recorded in The Assize Rolls for Yorkshire in 1219. Peter le Abbot (the Abbot) of Essex is documented in the records of the Hornchurch priory, and is also mention of Ralph Abbod in the Assize Rolls for Somerset in 1272. [2]

Important Dates for the Ebbitt family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ebbitt research. Another 58 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1306, 1577, 1912, 1565, 1642, 1562, 1633, 1612, 1633, 1560, 1617, 1603, 1648, 1588, 1662 and 1623 are included under the topic Early Ebbitt History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ebbitt Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Ebbitt include Abbott, Abbot, Abbotts, Abbett, Abbet, Abott and others.

Early Notables of the Ebbitt family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Maurice or Morris Abbot (1565-1642), was an eminent merchant, Governor of the East India Company, and Lord Mayor of London, the fifth and youngest son of Maurice Abbot, a clothworker of Guildford. George Abbot (1562-1633), Archbishop of Canterbury, the fourth Chancellor of Trinity College, Dublin, between 1612 and 1633. He was one of the translators of the Bible. "His father, Maurice Abbot, was a clothworker of the town. Abbot's parents were staunch Protestants; they had first 'embraced the truth of the Gospel in King Edward's days, and were persecuted for it in...
Another 142 words (10 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ebbitt Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ebbitt family to Ireland

Some of the Ebbitt family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ebbitt migration to the United States

Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Ebbitt were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records:

Ebbitt Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Richard Ebbitt, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1877 [3]

Ebbitt migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Ebbitt Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. George Ebbitt, (b. 1855), aged 18, Irish farm labourer from Cavan travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Surat" going to Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand in 1873, the ship sunk at the Catlins River all the passengers were transported to Dunedin via various rescure vessels [4]

Citations

  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
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